Ten Inspiring Reads for Every Dream Chaser

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“Every great dream begins with a dreamer” ― Harriet Tubman


I was born a dream chaser
and so are you,
admit it or not, you know
it’s true.

So here are ten inspiring reads
to uplift your spirits
and boost of moral beads!

1. Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom

Tuesdays with Morrie

Inspiring words: “So many people walk around with a meaningless life. They seem half-asleep, even when they’re busy doing things they think are important. This is because they’re chasing the wrong things. The way you get meaning into your life is to devote yourself to loving others, devote yourself to your community around you, and devote yourself to creating something that gives you purpose and meaning.”

2. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

The Alchemist

Inspiring words: “It’s the possibility of having a dream come true that makes life interesting.”

3. Your Best Life Now: 7 Steps to Living at Your Full Potential by Joel Osteen

Your Best Life Now: 7 Steps to Living at Your Full Potential

Inspiring words: “No matter how many times you get knocked down, keep getting back up. God sees your resolve. He sees your determination. And when you do everything you can do, that’s when God will step in and do what you can’t do.”

4. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

Steve Jobs

Inspiring words: “Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.”

5. Three Weeks With My Brother by Nicholas Sparks and Micah Sparks

Three Weeks With My Brother

Inspiring words: “When you chase a dream, you learn about yourself. You learn your capabilities and limitations, and the value of hard work and persistence.”

6. I Am the Messenger by Markus Zusak

I Am the Messenger

Inspiring words: “I’d rather chase the sun than wait for it.”

7. On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King

On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

Inspiring words: “The scariest moment is always just before you start.”

8. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini 

The Kite Runner

Inspiring words: “And suddenly, just like that, hope became knowledge. I was going to win. It was just a matter of when.”

9. All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

All the Light We Cannot See

Inspiring words: “A real diamond is never perfect.”

10. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (Harry Potter, #1) by J.K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (Harry Potter, #1)

Inspiring words: “It does not do to dwell on dreams and forget to live.”

Photo credit: Goodreads


In response to The Broke and the Bookish‘s Top Ten Tuesday today:

April 12: Ten Books Every X Should Read (up to you! Examples: every history nerd, memoir lover, ballet lover, feminist, college student, etc etc.)

P.S. What one book would you add on this list?

Share it to me! 😀

~

Fave Tearjerker Reads

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“No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader.” ― Robert Frost


I am admittedly
a dark-writer.
Scribbler of
tragic incidents,
composer of
painful heartaches,
killer of
several lives.

It is then
I realized,
that the books
I loved,
are those which
make me cry,
and those
which dried up
my heart and eyes.


So here are my Five-Star Favorite Tearjerkers of all Time

1. Message in a Bottle by Nicholas Sparks

Message in a Bottle

2. Me Before You (Me Before You, #1) by Jojo Moyes 

Me Before You (Me Before You, #1)

3. If I Stay (If I Stay, #1) by Gayle Forman

If I Stay (If I Stay, #1)

4. Leaving Time by Jodi Picoult

Leaving Time

5. The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold

The Lovely Bones

6. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

The Book Thief

7. All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

All the Light We Cannot See

8. The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto by Mitch Albom

The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto

9. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

The Kite Runner

10. All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

All the Bright Places

Photo credit: Goodreads


In response to The Broke and the Bookish‘s Top Ten Tuesday today:

March 22: Ten Books I Really Love But Feel Like I Haven’t Talked About Enough/In A While

P.S. What are your top tearjerker reads? Or maybe your fave reads recently?

Tell me? 😀

~

Books with Historical Settings that I Loved

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“The past is never where you think you left it.” ― Katherine Anne Porter

The Broke and the Bookish‘s Top Ten Tuesday today is a bit hard to fill out!

February 2: Top Ten Historical Settings You Love/ Ten Historical Settings You’d Love To See or Top Futuristic Books You Love/Ten Futuristic Societies I’d Love To Read in Books

With my love-hate relationship with classic books, I can only share less than ten (or even less than five) but I will still list them! 😉

So let’s start, here are the Books with Historical Settings that I Loved!

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

The Kite Runner

Amir is the son of a wealthy Kabul merchant, a member of the ruling caste of Pashtuns. Hassan, his servant and constant companion, is a Hazara, a despised and impoverished caste. Their uncommon bond is torn by Amir’s choice to abandon his friend amidst the increasing ethnic, religious, and political tensions of the dying years of the Afghan monarchy, wrenching them far apart. But so strong is the bond between the two boys that Amir journeys back to a distant world, to try to right past wrongs against the only true friend he ever had.

The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto by Mitch Albom

The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto

Frankie, born in a burning church, abandoned as an infant, and raised by a music teacher in a small Spanish town, until war rips his life apart. At nine years old, he is sent to America in the bottom of a boat. His only possession is an old guitar and six precious strings. His amazing journey weaves him through the musical landscape of the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, with his stunning playing and singing talent affecting numerous stars (Duke Ellington, Hank Williams, Elvis Presley) until, as if predestined, he becomes a pop star himself.

He makes records. He is adored. But Frankie Presto’s gift is also his burden, as he realizes the power of the strings his teacher gave him, and how, through his music, he can actually affect people’s lives. At the height of his popularity, tortured by his biggest mistake, he vanishes. His legend grows. Only decades later, having finally healed his heart, does Frankie reappearjust before his spectacular death—to change one last life. With the Spirit of Music as our guide, we glimpse into the lives that were changed by one man whose strings could touch the music—and the magic—in each of us.

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

All the Light We Cannot See

Marie-Laure lives with her father in Paris near the Museum of Natural History, where he works as the master of its thousands of locks. When she is six, Marie-Laure goes blind and her father builds a perfect miniature of their neighborhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. When she is twelve, the Nazis occupy Paris and father and daughter flee to the walled citadel of Saint-Malo, where Marie-Laure’s reclusive great-uncle lives in a tall house by the sea. With them they carry what might be the museum’s most valuable and dangerous jewel.

In a mining town in Germany, the orphan Werner grows up with his younger sister, enchanted by a crude radio they find. Werner becomes an expert at building and fixing these crucial new instruments, a talent that wins him a place at a brutal academy for Hitler Youth, then a special assignment to track the resistance. More and more aware of the human cost of his intelligence, Werner travels through the heart of the war and, finally, into Saint-Malo, where his story and Marie-Laure’s converge.

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

The Color Purple

Taking place mostly in rural Georgia, the story focuses on the life of women of color in the southern United States in the 1930s, addressing numerous issues including their exceedingly low position in American social culture. The novel has been the frequent target of censors and appears on the American Library Association list of the 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 2000-2009 at number seventeen because of the sometimes explicit content, particularly in terms of violence.

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

The Book Thief

It’s just a small story really, about among other things: a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. . . .

Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak’s groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist–books. With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, she learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement before he is marched to Dachau.

11/22/63 by Stephen King

11/22/63

Life can turn on a dime—or stumble into the extraordinary, as it does for Jake Epping, a high school English teacher in Lisbon Falls, Maine. While grading essays by his GED students, Jake reads a gruesome, enthralling piece penned by janitor Harry Dunning: fifty years ago, Harry somehow survived his father’s sledgehammer slaughter of his entire family. Jake is blown away…but an even more bizarre secret comes to light when Jake’s friend Al, owner of the local diner, enlists Jake to take over the mission that has become his obsession—to prevent the Kennedy assassination. How? By stepping through a portal in the diner’s storeroom, and into the era of Ike and Elvis, of big American cars, sock hops, and cigarette smoke… Finding himself in warmhearted Jodie, Texas, Jake begins a new life. But all turns in the road lead to a troubled loner named Lee Harvey Oswald. The course of history is about to be rewritten…and become heart-stoppingly suspenseful.

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s third book, stands as the supreme achievement of his career. This exemplary novel of the Jazz Age has been acclaimed by generations of readers. The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when The New York Times noted “gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession,” it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s.

Manuscript Found in Accra by Paulo Coelho 

Manuscript Found in Accra

July 14, 1099. Jerusalem awaits the invasion of the crusaders who have surrounded the city’s gates. There, inside the ancient city’s walls, men and women of every age and every faith have gathered to hear the wise words of a mysterious man known only as the Copt. He has summoned the townspeople to address their fears with truth:

“Tomorrow, harmony will become discord. Joy will be replaced by grief. Peace will give way to war…. None of us can know what tomorrow will hold, because each day has its good and its bad moments. So, when you ask your questions, forget about the troops outside and the fear inside. Our task is not to leave a record of what happened on this date for those who will inherit the Earth; history will take care of that. Therefore, we will speak about our daily lives, about the difficulties we have had to face.”

Summary and photo credit: Goodreads


Have you read some of these books, too?

What are your thoughts?

🙂

~

Top Ten Tuesday: Book To Movie Adaptations I Still Need To Watch and I am Excited to Watch!

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“Books and movies are like apples and oranges. They both are fruit, but taste completely different.” – Stephen King

The Broke and the Bookish Top Ten Tuesday for this week gave me a mixed ‘feels’.

November 10: Top Ten Book To Movie Adaptations I’m Looking Forward To or Ten Book To Movie Adaptations I Still Need To Watch

I love books and I love movies, too! But, a lot of novel-based movies are not as good as its printed counterpart. 

You agree with me?

Nonetheless, here’s the Book To Movie Adaptations I Still Need To Watch plus some Book To Movie Adaptations I’m Looking Forward.

Note: This list only includes books that I’VE READ.

— BOOK TO MOVIE ADAPTATIONS I STILL NEED TO WATCH —

1. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

The Book Thief

2. The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold

The Lovely Bones

3. Still Alice by Lisa Genova

Still Alice

4. Paper Towns by John Green

Paper Towns

5. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby

Extra Large Movie Poster Image for The Great Gatsby

6. Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

Speak

7. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson 

Steve Jobs

8. The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom

The Five People You Meet in Heaven

9. Mockingjay (The Hunger Games, #3) Part 1 by Suzanne Collins

Mockingjay (The Hunger Games, #3)

10. The Best of Me by Nicholas Sparks

The Best of Me

— UPCOMING BOOK TO MOVIE ADAPTATIONS I AM EXCITED TO WATCH —

1. Me Before You (Me Before You, #1) by Jojo Moyes

Me Before You (Me Before You, #1)

Yep. It’s on the works, now with complete cast and crew and Game of Thrones’ Emilia Clarke will play as Louisa Clark. The movie will be out on June 03, 2016.

2. Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell

Eleanor & Park

That’s according to Rainbow herself. 🙂 Thought the latest news in that DreamWorks will do the film version but shooting and cast is yet to be revealed.

3. The Rosie Project (Don Tillman #1) by Graeme Simsion

The Rosie Project

The movie is currently in development under Sony Pictures. Jennifer Lawrence of The Hunger Games has, sadly and recently dropped out of the movie. I am still excited, though!

4. The Selection (The Selection, #1) by Kiera Cass

The Selection (The Selection, #1)

Yes, I am still annoyed at Eadlyn of The Heir but I will not deny that I loved the first three novels of The Selection. So I was excited to know that Warner Bros. bought the rights to make a movie adaptation of this series!

5. The First Phone Call from Heaven by Mitch Albom

The First Phone Call from Heaven

This gets me too excited! 😀 Last 2014, Warner Bros.  acquired the rights to produce a movie based on this book, that you know I truly love. There are no current news about its cast yet but I will be surely so happy if this project will push through. 🙂

6. Allegiant (Divergent, #3) by Veronica Roth

Allegiant (Divergent, #3)

Yes, I am not a fan of how this series ended but of course I will still watch this film! The movie will be released on March 18, 2016.

7. Mockingjay (The Hunger Games, #3) Part 2 by Suzanne Collins

Mockingjay (The Hunger Games, #3)

I also don’t like the ending of this awesome YA series but still, I just want to know how the screenplay would interpret the written words for one last time. 🙂 This will be out on November 20!

8. The Choice by Nicholas Sparks

The Choice

The Choice Movie Poster

The Choice is one of my Top 10 favourite Sparks novel. (Here’s Part II) So I was giddy when he announced that it will be made into a movie. BUT, the trailer made me sad. I can clearly sense that the screenplay is entirely different. The worst part is that they ‘changed’ the part that made me love the story most.

—————

So there! Glad to share all of these with you!

Please comment and share your thoughts, and your TTT links, too!

🙂

Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Not Scary but Definitely Creepy Books

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“So what, ghosts can’t hurt you. That’s what I thought then.”  Stephen King, Bag of Bones

I am no fan of ghosts or monster novels that is why I am kinda having some hard time with today’s The Broke and the Bookish‘s Halloween-inspired Top Ten Tuesday.

October 27: Halloween themed freebie

So instead of promising that this list will be full of SCARY novels, which I cannot actually promise, I opted to share to you books that definitely gave me creeps. Here are the Ten Not Scary but Definitely Creepy Books:

1. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

The Book Thief

Death is the storyteller of this book, isn’t it creepy?

2. The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold

The Lovely Bones

Susie Salmon, a teenage girl raped and murdered, told her gruesome story from heaven.  Yeah, for me it’s creepy.

3. 1st to Die (Women’s Murder Club, #1) by James Patterson

1st to Die (Women's Murder Club, #1)

A serial killer murders who murders newly-wed brides really sounds creepy to me.

4. Defending Jacob by William Landay

Defending Jacob

The main plot is actually a bit ordinary but the ending definitely give me creeps.

5. Leaving Time by Jodi Picoult

Leaving Time

I had a lot of goosebumps when the main twist was told, it’s just… unexpected.

6. We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

We Were Liars

Just like Leaving Time, I was not also ready when I reached the end of this book. It’s just so creepy!

7. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn 

Gone Girl

This novel and its movie are not just creepy. They are insane!!!

8. And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

And Then There Were None

I never sang “Ten Little Indian Boys” after I read this book.

9. The Cuckoo’s Calling (Cormoran Strike, #1) by Robert Galbraith

The Cuckoo's Calling (Cormoran Strike, #1)

As a sucker of whodunit and muder mysteries, this book indeed gave me a lot of creeps.

10. Rising Sun by Michael Crichton

Rising Sun

As the first full-length novel that I have read, this book introduced me to the world of gross murders and thrilling plot. So yes, this complete my list.


Photo credits: All book covers are from Goodreads.

So that was it!

I hope you agree that these books are creepy enough!

I would love to hear your thoughts!

And to read your list, too!

~

Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Author Duos You’d LOVE To See Write A Book Together

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“A writer’s brain is like a magician’s hat. If you’re going to get anything out of it, you have to put something in it first.” ― Louis L’Amour

It’s Top Ten Tuesday again and this week, The Broke and the Bookish put the spotlight on the people behind the words, the authors!

October 13: Top Ten Author Duos You’d LOVE To See Write A Book Together

This will take a lot of time but I will try to do it quick! 😀

So here are the duos that I would love to see, hopefully!

1. Kiera Cass + Colleen Hoover = Fairytalish  and suspense/mystery YA

The Selection (The Selection, #1)Never Never (Never Never, #1)

2. Rainbow Rowell + Graeme Simsion = Ultimate book with odd yet lovable characters

Eleanor & ParkThe Rosie Project (Don Tillman #1)

3. Anthony Doerr +  Alice Walker = Ultimate historical fiction

All the Light We Cannot SeeThe Color Purple

4. Alice Sebold + Jojo Moyes = Ultimate tearjerker

The Lovely BonesMe Before You (Me Before You, #1)

5. Stephen King + James Patterson = Ultimate sci-fi mystery thriller

11/22/631st to Die (Women's Murder Club, #1)

6. Jodi Picoult + Liane Moriarty = Ultimate mystery/romance/family novel

Leaving TimeThe Husband's Secret

7. E. Lockhart + Gillian Flynn = Ultimately ‘insane’ story

We Were LiarsGone Girl

8. Paulo Coelho + Markus Zusak = Ultimate inspiring and spiritually deep novel

The AlchemistI Am the Messenger

9. Gayle Forman + Robert Galbraith = Ultimate love and mystery thriller

If I Stay (If I Stay, #1)The Silkworm (Cormoran Strike, #2)

10.  Mitch Albom + Nicholas Sparks = THE BEST NOVEL EVER! 😀 ❤ (Sorry for fangirling!)

The Five People You Meet in HeavenThe Notebook (The Notebook, #1)


That’s it!

Share your thoughts to me, please! 😀

And your links, too!

🙂

~

BOOK READS: A Review of The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

Picture1Emotionally haunting. Vividly described violence while expressing hope. 

After reading Markus Zusak‘s I Am the Messenger , I was convinced that he is indeed a not-your-ordinary author.

And as I read The Book Thief, I have proven how ‘deep’ he really is.

The Book Thief

Genre: Historical Fiction

Published: 2005

Rating: 💖💖💖 (You MAY read it.)

THE STORY:

Liesel Meminger, a nine-year old girl, is surrounded with tragedies. She saw her brother died. Her mother left her in Himmel Street with her new parents, Hans and Rosa Hubermann.

Amid the war and the violence during the German Nazi regime, Liesel has become her own kind of criminal. She chose to be a Book Thief.

Little does she know that her love of words will lead her to her life’s greatest despair.

THE BLURB:

It took me more than a month to finish this book. This is not because the story is boring. It is in fact because the story’s depth requires time to fully understand.

Markus Zusak is indeed a one-of-a-kind author with unique techniques in telling his own story. His chosen storyteller in this novel is creepy yet emotionally touching at the same time.

I can’t also help but admire how he used silence to highlight the violence surrounding Liesel.

Though this story is full of sense and contains strong emotions, I still give this book 3 hearts rating because I think it is a bit too long.

Nonetheless, The Book Thief is still a story worth reading.

THE WISE WORDS:

People observe the colors of a day only at its beginnings and ends. 

People have defining moments, I suppose, especially when they’re children.

THE WRAP:

A dark story told by a creepy storyteller. A novel not short of depthness, worth and hope.

~

2015 Reading Challenge Update: 32nd and 33rd books

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A book with non-human characters and a book with more than 500 pages.

It has been a long time since I published an update for my 2015 Reading Challenge. It is because my reading pace has slowed down 😦 because my writing job is just so draining.

On a positive note, here are my recent reads for these categories:

A book with non-human characters (32nd) – Every Day bDavid Levithan

Every Day (Every Day, #1)

Synopsis: Every day a different body. Every day a different life. Every day in love with the same girl.
There’s never any warning about where it will be or who it will be. A has made peace with that, even established guidelines by which to live: Never get too attached. Avoid being noticed. Do not interfere.

It’s all fine until the morning that A wakes up in the body of Justin and meets Justin’s girlfriend, Rhiannon. From that moment, the rules by which A has been living no longer apply. Because finally A has found someone he wants to be with—day in, day out, day after day.

I consider the main character of this awesome book a non-human because I can’t even determine what should I call him/her or it.

But that doesn’t mean this novel by David Levithan is not great. It is actually unique and thought-provoking. I cannot wait for the sequel, actually! 🙂

A book with more than 500 pages – The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

The Book Thief

Synopsis: It’s just a small story really, about among other things: a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. . . .

Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak’s groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist–books. With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, she learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement before he is marched to Dachau.

This is an unforgettable story about the ability of books to feed the soul.

It took me also a month to finish this book because of my busy schedule and because of its more than 500 pages.

On the other hand, The Book Thief is not short on sense and depth. It is one of those few books that can move you not in a so blatant manner.

Zusak has subtly described the violence during the Holocaust era in Germany and his main character, Liesel, and his storyteller, Death (yes, you’re reading it right), makes this story an emotionally gripping novel.

(I will be posting my review for this book soon.) 🙂

So there!

Till my next update. 🙂

~

Update for the Late

Been absent for quite a while now so here are some book updates and life updates for this past few weeks.

  • I am now a GHOST Writer. – You know what I mean if you’ve read my most recent post, Ghost. This is the reason behind my blogging hiatus but it is worth it though.
  • I finished four books. After my last update, I only finished four books, well I would blame my writing job again. It has been eating a great portion of my brain. 😀 These four books include:

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

Gone Girl

I Am the Messenger by Markus Zusak

I Am the Messenger

and Adultery by Paulo Coelho.

Adultery

Will share my thoughts about these four books later, hopefully!

~