Mahulog Sa’yo | Fall For You*

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*Very first collaboration with the writer-best-friend I never got to have, my now proud Filipina blogger-best-friend and an equally gifted poetess and storyteller, Maria of Doodles and Scribbles.

She wrote the lovely Tagalog (language of the Philippines) poem and I tried translating it to English. ❤ Thank you for letting me do that, Maria. ❤


Mahulog Sa’yo | Fall For You

Sanay na akong nakasunod | I have always been
sa iyong mga yapak, | a follower of your steps,
At ang anino mo’y | Behind your shadows
pilit hinanagilap. | I have never left.

Kuntento na akong pagmasdan | It is enough for me to stare
sa likod ng pintuan, | behind silent closed doors,
Ang pagsilay ng iyong mga ngiti | Waiting for your sweet smile
na sa aking pagod ay pumapawi. | that erases my soul’s remorse.

Kaya, mahal, pakiusap ko lang, | To you my love I beg,
Hayaan mong ako’y magmahal, | Just let me love you,
sa lihim lamang. | inside hidden heart’s keg.

Wag mo akong dalhin sa tuktok | Don’t let me reach your heart’s peak
para lang iyong iwanan, | Only to wait for your absent heart beats.
Wag mo akong bigyan ng dahilan para isipinm | Don’t let my mind wonder,
na maaaring may pag-asa, | that we have a future to share,
na maaaring ako’y mahal mo rin pala | that you can love me too, oh dear.

Dahil kung sakali man | Cause just in case,
handa akong tumalon. | know that I’m willing to jump.
Handa akong mahulog para sa iyo. | From a high cliff towards you.
Handa akong mahulog sa iyo. | To fall even to death just to be with you.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash.com


In response to Napowrimo Day 30. (yes, I’m done catching up! :D)

 

And now our prompt (still optional!) Because we’ve spent our month looking at poets in English translation, today I’d like you to try your hand at a translation of your own. If you know a foreign language, you could take a crack at translating a poem by a poet writing in that language.

Read the rest of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!

 

Remember: A Rosemary*

remember

Remember: A Rosemary*

If you will ask my heart, it will tell you
All that she wants is to remember you

Your warm morning breath that whispers sweet words
they were never absent, not even once
each tickles, makes my heartbeat jump and dance
I wish I remember hearing your words

Your tender touch that calms weary mind
they’re like sunrays that wakes my soul alive
each caress quiets the monsters inside
I wish your touch’s mem’ries  stay on my mind.

I want to remember all about you,
I want nothing else but.. Wait. Who are you?

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: HD Wallpaper


In response to Napowrimo Day 29. (yes, I’m catching up! :D)

 

Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem based on things you remember. Try to focus on specific details, and don’t worry about whether the memories are of important events, or are connected to each other. You could start by adopting Brainard’s uniform habit of starting every line with “I remember,” and then you could either cut out all the instances of “I remember,” or leave them all in, or leave just a few in. At any rate, hopefully you’ll wind up with a poem that is heavy on concrete detail, and which uses that detail as its connective tissue.

*Rosemary (Yes! A poetic form that’s almost exactly my name! :D)

The Rosemary is an invented verse form that uses envelope quatrains. It was introduced by Viola Berg.

The Rosemary is:

  • a poem in 12 lines, made up of a rhymed couplet, 2 envelope quatrains followed by a rhymed couplet.
  • metric, iambic pentameter.
  • rhymed aabccbdeedff.
  • L4,L5 and L8,L9 are indented.

Read more of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!

Mother’s Choices: Two Kimo*

mother

Mother’s Choices: Two Kimo*
(A poem for the strongest woman I call Nanay)

She gave birth to a baby she called Rose.
Loving beyond borders, walls.
She somehow made the right choice.

Miles from home she ran with the man she loves.
Her beating heart overruled.
Her innocence captured.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to Napowrimo Day 28. (yes, I’m catching up! :D)

 

And now, for our prompt (optional, as always). Today I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that tells a story. But here’s the twist – the story should be told backwards. The first line should say what happened last, and work its way through the past until you get to the beginning. Now, the story doesn’t have to be complicated (it’s probably better if it isn’t)!

*Kimo

The Kimo is an Israeli version of the haiku, found at Poetry Kaleidoscope. There should be no movement in the imagery.

The Kimo is:

  • a tristich, a 3 line poem.
  • syllabic 10-7-6 syllables per line.
  • unrhymed.

Read more of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!

Woman’s Worth: A Cinq Trois Deca La Rhyme*

worth

Woman’s Worth: A Cinq Trois Deca La Rhyme*

Your staring wide grinning eyes consume the beauty I behold.
From my face to my toes you gaze as if I’m a shining gold.
Words will be futile, ‘cause your malicious gape speak for itself.
Dark dreamy, steamy scenes your mind creates, I can see myself.
Stop! For your soul’s sake put your vicious visions in state of dearth.
I have wise mind and kind heart, they are my assets since my birth.

I am more than flawless face and bare body that’re rare on earth,
I am more than the lustful illusions you can never hold,
I am more than the photo-shopped babe in your men’s cave bookshelf,
I’m more than what you can see and feel. No words can speak my worth.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to Napowrimo Day 27. (yes, I’m catching up! :D)

 

Today’s prompt comes to us from Megan Pattie, who points us to the work of the Irish poet Ciaran Carson, who increasingly writes using very long lines. Carson has stated that his lines are (partly) based on the seventeen syllables of the haiku, and that he strives to achieve the clarity of the haiku in each line. So today, Megan and I collectively challenge you to write a poem with very long lines.

*Cinq Trois Deca La Rhyme

Cinq Trois Deca La Rhyme is an invented form found at Shadow Poetry, created by Laura Lamarca. The Cinq Trois Deca La Rhyme is:

  • a decastich, a poem in 10 lines.
  • syllabic, 15 syllables per line.
  • rhymed, rhyme scheme aabbcccabc.

Read more of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!

Love Chant*

chant

Love Chant*

How do I love thee?
I’ll write you letters till your eyes cannot see.

How do I love thee?
I’ll reach you even in the deepest blue sea.

How do I love thee?
I’ll sing you songs till you can’t hear me.

How do I love thee?
I’ll command the stars to shine to you brightly.

How do I love thee?
I’ll hold your hand, till it’s gray and skinny.

How do I love thee?
I’ll tell the wind to breathe life to you endlessly.

How do I love thee?
I’ll remind you of our love, when your brain forgets about me.

How do I love thee?
I’ll stopped time, when your heartbeat dies slowly.

How do I love thee?
I can say more but nothing will ever be enough, to tell you…
How do I love thee.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to Napowrimo Day 26. (yes, I’m catching up! :D)

 

Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that incorporates a call and response. Calls-and-responses are used in many sermons and hymns (and also in sea chanties!), in which the preacher or singer asks a question or makes an exclamation, and the audience responds with a specific, pre-determined response.

*Chant

The Chant is from Latin cantus, meaning song, but this genre of verse dates back far beyond the days of Homer and Virgil. As most verse, it began as an oral tradition and it probably was heard echoing off the walls of cave dwellers in prehistoric times. The chant is verse in which a word, phrase, line and rhythm is repeated again and again. The repetition is strong and the rhythm hypnotic. But it didn’t get left behind in the caves, more modern verse forms or poetic genres have employed elements of the chant, such as the blues and slave or prison work songs.

The Chant is:

  • repetitive, usually a word, phrase, line, a rhythm is repeated over and over.
  • musical, it should contain a rhythmic beat.
  • written without a beginning, middle or end.
  • rhymed at the discretion of the poet.

Read more of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!

Sweet Sun: A Scallop*

scallop

Sweet Sun: A Scallop*

Sweet sun,
send me the moon.
Save soul slowly sinking,
steady sea I’m seeking,
where soul can soon
stay shun.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to Daily Post: Scars and Napowrimo Day 25. (yes, I’m catching up! :D)

 

Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that begins with a line from a another poem (not necessarily the first one), but then goes elsewhere with it.

The first two lines of this poem is from Sara Bareilles’ song: Send Me the Moon.

 

Darkness to light
Moved from day into night
To be near you
Still here I stand
I am sinking like sand
In your sea

Sweet sun
Send me the moon
Empty the skies out
Bringing me one step closer
To you
Send it soon
And I will breathe in, breathe out
‘Til you come in and out
Of view

*Scallop

The Scallop is an invented stanzaic form written in sixains. It was created by Marie L Blanche Adams.

The Scallop is:

  • stanzaic, written in any number of sixains.
  • syllabic, 2-4-6-6-4-2 syllables per line.
  • rhymed, rhyme scheme abccba deffed ghiihg etc.

Read more of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!

Former Performer: A Butterfly Verse*

butterfly

Former Performer: A Butterfly Verse*

Old man
with ebullience,
lives beneath rusty lamp,
beside rubbish, stinky trash dump.
Sudden
epiphany, with eloquence
he sings ethereally,
‘fore ephemeral
voice fades.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to Napowrimo Day 24. (yes, I’m catching up! :D)

 

Today I challenge you to write a “mix-and-match” poem in which you mingle fancy vocabulary with distinctly un-fancy words. First, spend five minutes writing a list of overly poetic words – words that you think just sound too high-flown to really be used by anyone in everyday speech.

*Butterfly Verse

Butterflies are shape poems. I am embarrassed to admit I found a few links to different Butterfly verse forms but when I went back to look more closely I keep getting an error. So although there is a Butterfly Septet and a Butterfly Kimo somewhere out there, right now I can’t give you any details. I was able to find a different site for the Butterfly Cinquain however. Here it is:

  • Butterfly Cinquain isn’t a cinquain at all:it is a nonostich (9 lines)and uses the syllable count of the Crapsey Cinquain and then reverses it, therefore the misnomer.
  • The Butterfly Cinquain is:
    • 9 line poem.
    • syllabic, 2-4-6-8-2-8-6-4-2 syllables per line.
    • unrhymed.

Read more of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!

 

Scarred Heart: A Sonnet*

scarred

This is the first sonnet I have written on my own and yes, I am nervous. (Forgive me if I did not observe the required iambic pentameter!)

Scarred Heart: A Sonnet*

My heart is a pristine, clean, plain canvass,
so white and pure, innocently demure.
It beats in bliss, sometimes slow, sometimes fast
always full, always sure, never impure.
Like a blossoming bloom it smells so sweet,
brought by nectar– its fragrant honey flesh.
Then like a buzzing bee looking for treats,
you suck hungrily ‘till I’m left a mess.
My heart’s once bright petals started to wilt,
as the ghost of your love tears up my leaves.
Promises uttered broken without guilt,
stems wreaked havoc, buried in dark deep eve.
When will my scarred heart bloom and beat again?
Please tell me, scars won’t forever remain.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to Daily Post: Scars and Napowrimo Day 23. (yes, I’m catching up! :D)

 

Today, I challenge you to write a sonnet. Traditionally, sonnets are 14-line poems, with ten syllables per line, written in iambs (i.e., with a meter in which an unstressed syllable is followed by one stressed syllable, and so on). There are several traditional rhyme schemes, including the Petrarchan, Spenserian, and Shakespearean sonnets. But beyond the strictures of form, sonnets usually pose a question of a sort, explore the ideas raised by the question, and then come to a conclusion.

*Sonnet

All sonnets should be:

  • a lyrical meditation. The sonnet should sing.
  • usually composed with themes of love, spirituality, nature, sorrow or celebration.
  • a quatorzain , (a poem in 14 lines).
  • metric. In English, the sonnet is primarily written in iambic pentameter.
  • rhymed. The rhyme scheme is one of the features that identify the individual sonnets. (The Unrhymed and Blank sonnets by name deliberately lack rhyme which technically would be a nonce unrhymed scheme.) See the Sonnet Comparison Chart.
  • written with question-answer or conflict-resolution structure.
  • composed with a turn or change in tone. It is the positioning of this pivot or volta that is also a defining feature of sonnet.

Read more of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!

 

Earth’s Tenants: An Envelope Quintet*

earth

Earth’s Tenants: An Envelope Quintet*

We’re just tenants and not owners
of this world called earth–
witness to billions of death, birth,
mystery’s it’s worth.
So let’s live and not be mourners.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to Napowrimo Day 22. (yes, I’m catching up! :D)

 

Today’s prompt comes to us from Gloria Gonsalves, who also suggested our prompt for Day Seven. Today, Gloria challenges us all to write a poem in honor of Earth Day. This could be about your own backyard, a national park, or anything from a maple tree to a humpback whale.

*Envelope Quintet

Envelope Quintet (Italian) is a 5 line verse in which the center lines are enclosed by the rhyme of the outer lines.

The Envelope Quintet is:

  • stanzaic, a quintet may be a stand alone poem or can be written in any number of 5 line stanzas.
  • meter at the discretion of the poet.
  • rhymed abcba or aabaa or abbba , subsequent stanzas may link or continue the rhyme scheme: linked abcba cdedc or abcba deced / continued is simply abcba defed etc.

Read more of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!

Breathe: A Waka* with Kennings**

waka

Breathe: A Waka* with Kennings**

Come breaker of trees
Crawl ‘tween shining sky-candle
and vast blue whale’s way,
blow the burning bane of wood
breathe life back to me, for good.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to Napowrimo Day 20. (yes, catching up! :D)

 

And finally, our prompt (optional, as always)! Today’s prompt comes to us from Vince Gotera, who suggests a prompt very much in keeping with our poet in translation, a “kenning” poem.

**Kennings were riddle-like metaphors used in the Norse sagas. Basically, they are ways of calling something not by its actual name, but by a sort of clever, off-kilter description — for example, the sea would be called the “whale road.” Today, I challenge you to think of a single thing or person (a house, your grandmother, etc), and then write a poem that consists of kenning-like descriptions of that thing or person. 

Kennings I used are:

Wind – breaker of trees
Sun – sky-candle
Sea – whale’s way
Fire – bane of wood

*Waka

The waka is:

  • a pentastich, a poem written in 5 lines.
  • syllabic, 5-7-5-7-7 syllables. 31 onji, in English, 31 syllables.
  • true to the heart of the poet. The inspiration is to be drawn from the experience.
  • an early model for the tanka and many other Japanese forms.
  • gathered into collections. In most Japanese anthologies poems are arranged in seasonal sequence followed by considered, poetic-worthy topics such as love or grief.

Read more of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!