Ten Inspiring Reads for Every Dream Chaser

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“Every great dream begins with a dreamer” ― Harriet Tubman


I was born a dream chaser
and so are you,
admit it or not, you know
it’s true.

So here are ten inspiring reads
to uplift your spirits
and boost of moral beads!

1. Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom

Tuesdays with Morrie

Inspiring words: “So many people walk around with a meaningless life. They seem half-asleep, even when they’re busy doing things they think are important. This is because they’re chasing the wrong things. The way you get meaning into your life is to devote yourself to loving others, devote yourself to your community around you, and devote yourself to creating something that gives you purpose and meaning.”

2. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

The Alchemist

Inspiring words: “It’s the possibility of having a dream come true that makes life interesting.”

3. Your Best Life Now: 7 Steps to Living at Your Full Potential by Joel Osteen

Your Best Life Now: 7 Steps to Living at Your Full Potential

Inspiring words: “No matter how many times you get knocked down, keep getting back up. God sees your resolve. He sees your determination. And when you do everything you can do, that’s when God will step in and do what you can’t do.”

4. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

Steve Jobs

Inspiring words: “Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.”

5. Three Weeks With My Brother by Nicholas Sparks and Micah Sparks

Three Weeks With My Brother

Inspiring words: “When you chase a dream, you learn about yourself. You learn your capabilities and limitations, and the value of hard work and persistence.”

6. I Am the Messenger by Markus Zusak

I Am the Messenger

Inspiring words: “I’d rather chase the sun than wait for it.”

7. On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King

On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

Inspiring words: “The scariest moment is always just before you start.”

8. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini 

The Kite Runner

Inspiring words: “And suddenly, just like that, hope became knowledge. I was going to win. It was just a matter of when.”

9. All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

All the Light We Cannot See

Inspiring words: “A real diamond is never perfect.”

10. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (Harry Potter, #1) by J.K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (Harry Potter, #1)

Inspiring words: “It does not do to dwell on dreams and forget to live.”

Photo credit: Goodreads


In response to The Broke and the Bookish‘s Top Ten Tuesday today:

April 12: Ten Books Every X Should Read (up to you! Examples: every history nerd, memoir lover, ballet lover, feminist, college student, etc etc.)

P.S. What one book would you add on this list?

Share it to me! 😀

~

Fave Tearjerker Reads

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“No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader.” ― Robert Frost


I am admittedly
a dark-writer.
Scribbler of
tragic incidents,
composer of
painful heartaches,
killer of
several lives.

It is then
I realized,
that the books
I loved,
are those which
make me cry,
and those
which dried up
my heart and eyes.


So here are my Five-Star Favorite Tearjerkers of all Time

1. Message in a Bottle by Nicholas Sparks

Message in a Bottle

2. Me Before You (Me Before You, #1) by Jojo Moyes 

Me Before You (Me Before You, #1)

3. If I Stay (If I Stay, #1) by Gayle Forman

If I Stay (If I Stay, #1)

4. Leaving Time by Jodi Picoult

Leaving Time

5. The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold

The Lovely Bones

6. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

The Book Thief

7. All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

All the Light We Cannot See

8. The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto by Mitch Albom

The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto

9. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

The Kite Runner

10. All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

All the Bright Places

Photo credit: Goodreads


In response to The Broke and the Bookish‘s Top Ten Tuesday today:

March 22: Ten Books I Really Love But Feel Like I Haven’t Talked About Enough/In A While

P.S. What are your top tearjerker reads? Or maybe your fave reads recently?

Tell me? 😀

~

Out-of-comfort-zone Books I Loved

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“If you only read the books that everyone else is reading, you can only think what everyone else is thinking.” ― Haruki Murakami, Norwegian Wood


Surprises!

That is the main theme of  The Broke and the Bookish‘s Top Ten Tuesday today.

February 23:  Ten Book I Enjoyed Recently (last yearish) That Weren’t My Typical Genre/Type of Book (or that was out of your comfort zone)

So here are the out-of-comfort-zone books that I truly enjoyed recently. 🙂

1. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird

I am not into classics. But this one’s surely worth reading.

2. Love & Misadventure by Lang Leav

Love & Misadventure

This is my first read poetry book. I read it as I am getting addicted to writing my own poems. To say that I am crazy about this book and Lang Leav would be an understatement! 😀

3. The Small Backs of Children by Lidia Yuknavitch

The Small Backs of Children

A book I just read because I can’t sleep, I am surprised that I actually liked the brutality and the explicit language used in this book.

4. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

The Kite Runner

Historical fiction, though I enjoyed some, is not actually my to-read genre. But this one is, for me, one of the best.

5. The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto by Mitch Albom

The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto

I am a certified Albom fan, so why the hell this book is here?

It’s because magic and fantasy isn’t my comfort zone. And to tell you honestly, I am quite anxious that I will not like this novel as much as I loved Tuesdays with Morrie and his other books. BUT! I am wrong! 😀

6. The Pelican Brief by John Grisham

The Pelican Brief

Mystery and thrillers is my fave genre. But this came as a surprising hit for me as it is my first try for John Grisham. 🙂

7. All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

All the Light We Cannot See

With its intimidating length and historical depth, I thought this book will bore me. But I was, again, wrong! This is insanely a great read!

8. Still Alice by Lisa Genova

Still Alice

Medical drama is a genre I haven’t tried until this novel. And with the courageous and eloquent storytelling of Lisa Genova, I may read some more medical drama. 🙂

Photo and link credit: Goodreads


That will be it for this week!

Have you read some of this books?

If not, what are the books that surprised you?

Let’s dicuss!

 

Books with Historical Settings that I Loved

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“The past is never where you think you left it.” ― Katherine Anne Porter

The Broke and the Bookish‘s Top Ten Tuesday today is a bit hard to fill out!

February 2: Top Ten Historical Settings You Love/ Ten Historical Settings You’d Love To See or Top Futuristic Books You Love/Ten Futuristic Societies I’d Love To Read in Books

With my love-hate relationship with classic books, I can only share less than ten (or even less than five) but I will still list them! 😉

So let’s start, here are the Books with Historical Settings that I Loved!

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

The Kite Runner

Amir is the son of a wealthy Kabul merchant, a member of the ruling caste of Pashtuns. Hassan, his servant and constant companion, is a Hazara, a despised and impoverished caste. Their uncommon bond is torn by Amir’s choice to abandon his friend amidst the increasing ethnic, religious, and political tensions of the dying years of the Afghan monarchy, wrenching them far apart. But so strong is the bond between the two boys that Amir journeys back to a distant world, to try to right past wrongs against the only true friend he ever had.

The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto by Mitch Albom

The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto

Frankie, born in a burning church, abandoned as an infant, and raised by a music teacher in a small Spanish town, until war rips his life apart. At nine years old, he is sent to America in the bottom of a boat. His only possession is an old guitar and six precious strings. His amazing journey weaves him through the musical landscape of the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, with his stunning playing and singing talent affecting numerous stars (Duke Ellington, Hank Williams, Elvis Presley) until, as if predestined, he becomes a pop star himself.

He makes records. He is adored. But Frankie Presto’s gift is also his burden, as he realizes the power of the strings his teacher gave him, and how, through his music, he can actually affect people’s lives. At the height of his popularity, tortured by his biggest mistake, he vanishes. His legend grows. Only decades later, having finally healed his heart, does Frankie reappearjust before his spectacular death—to change one last life. With the Spirit of Music as our guide, we glimpse into the lives that were changed by one man whose strings could touch the music—and the magic—in each of us.

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

All the Light We Cannot See

Marie-Laure lives with her father in Paris near the Museum of Natural History, where he works as the master of its thousands of locks. When she is six, Marie-Laure goes blind and her father builds a perfect miniature of their neighborhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. When she is twelve, the Nazis occupy Paris and father and daughter flee to the walled citadel of Saint-Malo, where Marie-Laure’s reclusive great-uncle lives in a tall house by the sea. With them they carry what might be the museum’s most valuable and dangerous jewel.

In a mining town in Germany, the orphan Werner grows up with his younger sister, enchanted by a crude radio they find. Werner becomes an expert at building and fixing these crucial new instruments, a talent that wins him a place at a brutal academy for Hitler Youth, then a special assignment to track the resistance. More and more aware of the human cost of his intelligence, Werner travels through the heart of the war and, finally, into Saint-Malo, where his story and Marie-Laure’s converge.

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

The Color Purple

Taking place mostly in rural Georgia, the story focuses on the life of women of color in the southern United States in the 1930s, addressing numerous issues including their exceedingly low position in American social culture. The novel has been the frequent target of censors and appears on the American Library Association list of the 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 2000-2009 at number seventeen because of the sometimes explicit content, particularly in terms of violence.

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

The Book Thief

It’s just a small story really, about among other things: a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. . . .

Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak’s groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist–books. With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, she learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement before he is marched to Dachau.

11/22/63 by Stephen King

11/22/63

Life can turn on a dime—or stumble into the extraordinary, as it does for Jake Epping, a high school English teacher in Lisbon Falls, Maine. While grading essays by his GED students, Jake reads a gruesome, enthralling piece penned by janitor Harry Dunning: fifty years ago, Harry somehow survived his father’s sledgehammer slaughter of his entire family. Jake is blown away…but an even more bizarre secret comes to light when Jake’s friend Al, owner of the local diner, enlists Jake to take over the mission that has become his obsession—to prevent the Kennedy assassination. How? By stepping through a portal in the diner’s storeroom, and into the era of Ike and Elvis, of big American cars, sock hops, and cigarette smoke… Finding himself in warmhearted Jodie, Texas, Jake begins a new life. But all turns in the road lead to a troubled loner named Lee Harvey Oswald. The course of history is about to be rewritten…and become heart-stoppingly suspenseful.

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s third book, stands as the supreme achievement of his career. This exemplary novel of the Jazz Age has been acclaimed by generations of readers. The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when The New York Times noted “gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession,” it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s.

Manuscript Found in Accra by Paulo Coelho 

Manuscript Found in Accra

July 14, 1099. Jerusalem awaits the invasion of the crusaders who have surrounded the city’s gates. There, inside the ancient city’s walls, men and women of every age and every faith have gathered to hear the wise words of a mysterious man known only as the Copt. He has summoned the townspeople to address their fears with truth:

“Tomorrow, harmony will become discord. Joy will be replaced by grief. Peace will give way to war…. None of us can know what tomorrow will hold, because each day has its good and its bad moments. So, when you ask your questions, forget about the troops outside and the fear inside. Our task is not to leave a record of what happened on this date for those who will inherit the Earth; history will take care of that. Therefore, we will speak about our daily lives, about the difficulties we have had to face.”

Summary and photo credit: Goodreads


Have you read some of these books, too?

What are your thoughts?

🙂

~