excerpt 1: the vow

I remember how your photos would spark the poet in me, how your shots are like muses that breathed life to my poetry. How you sprinkled my poems with your kind words, generously.

How in each exchange of message I’ve got to know the man behind the camera, the man so composed and so inspiring, and the hiding inside a shell, truthfully hungry for love but acting like it is the last thing he needed.

r. c. gonzales – roy | page 139 of Poems for S
Sharing with you some excerpts of my upcoming book, Poems for S!
Pre-order available here: https://amzn.to/2CSrGAU .

Mockup for Facebook image_v2

©2019 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash

excerpt 4: the vow

I love how you made me brave. Like a spineless caterpillar you turned me into this brave but still soft butterfly, flying from one milestone to another because I know you always got my back. 

And I love you for choosing to break out of your shell to choose me. For your bravery to choose us.

r. c. gonzales – roy | page 145 of Poems for S
Sharing with you some excerpts of my upcoming book, Poems for S!
Pre-order available here: https://amzn.to/2CSrGAU .

Mockup for Facebook image_v2

©2019 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash

Rhythm and Rhyme

The hands of this vintage clock have ticked and turned more than a thousand times.
Likewise my old heart has beat millions da-dums, da-dums.
And now they are both yours, my poetry’s rhythm and rhyme.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Rachel Crowe


In response to Sonya of Only 100 Words‘ Three Line Tales Week Thirty.

If you want to join, here are the simple rules:

  • Write three lines inspired by the photo prompt.
  • Link back to this post.
  • Tag your post with 3LineTales (so we can find you in the Reader).
  • Read and comment on other TLT participants’ lines.
  • Have fun.

 

 

Love Chant*

chant

Love Chant*

How do I love thee?
I’ll write you letters till your eyes cannot see.

How do I love thee?
I’ll reach you even in the deepest blue sea.

How do I love thee?
I’ll sing you songs till you can’t hear me.

How do I love thee?
I’ll command the stars to shine to you brightly.

How do I love thee?
I’ll hold your hand, till it’s gray and skinny.

How do I love thee?
I’ll tell the wind to breathe life to you endlessly.

How do I love thee?
I’ll remind you of our love, when your brain forgets about me.

How do I love thee?
I’ll stopped time, when your heartbeat dies slowly.

How do I love thee?
I can say more but nothing will ever be enough, to tell you…
How do I love thee.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to Napowrimo Day 26. (yes, I’m catching up! :D)

 

Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that incorporates a call and response. Calls-and-responses are used in many sermons and hymns (and also in sea chanties!), in which the preacher or singer asks a question or makes an exclamation, and the audience responds with a specific, pre-determined response.

*Chant

The Chant is from Latin cantus, meaning song, but this genre of verse dates back far beyond the days of Homer and Virgil. As most verse, it began as an oral tradition and it probably was heard echoing off the walls of cave dwellers in prehistoric times. The chant is verse in which a word, phrase, line and rhythm is repeated again and again. The repetition is strong and the rhythm hypnotic. But it didn’t get left behind in the caves, more modern verse forms or poetic genres have employed elements of the chant, such as the blues and slave or prison work songs.

The Chant is:

  • repetitive, usually a word, phrase, line, a rhythm is repeated over and over.
  • musical, it should contain a rhythmic beat.
  • written without a beginning, middle or end.
  • rhymed at the discretion of the poet.

Read more of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!

Zillion Reasons: A Zéjel

z

Zillion Reasons: A Zéjel
©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer


I still love you, I’ll tell you why
Before I start, look at my eye
Oh, I hope yours’ll remain dry.

Remember when you stayed with me?
more than a week we wait and see,
if my sister will live or flee,
you hush my cries fearing she’ll die.

Remember when I’m so angry?
I won’t accept any sorry
I wanted to end our story
You said no, then with me, you cry.

Yes, your flaws almost made me bow,
but my heart still preserves our vow,
forever is compose of now,
I have zillion reasons to try.

Photo credit: Mayur Gala


In response to Blogging from A to Z ChallengeZ is for Zejel

Zejel

Zéjel is a romantic Spanish form with Arabic influence related to the Qasida and adopted by the Spanish troubadours of 15th century. The Zéjel is distinguished by linking rhyme established in the opening mudanza (strophe in which the theme is established in a mono-rhymed triplet). There have been many variations of the form, in Arabic it is called the Zahal.

The simplest and most common form of the Zéjel is:

  • syllabic, most often written in 8 syllable lines.
  • stanzaic, opening with a mono-rhymed triplet followed by any number of quatrains.
  • rhymed, the rhyme of the opening mudanza establishes a linking rhyme with the end line of the succeeding quatrains. Rhyme scheme, aaa bbba ddda etc.

Missed a letter/poem? Read all Poetry from A-Z here.