Waiting

with the God-painted twilight,
i smiled as i wait for you, my light.

i still don’t have your name,
i still don’t have your face,
but our story will not be a game
neither a fading phase.

the love we’ll share will be true,
someday we’ll be one not two,
darling, i am waiting for you.

Wrote this while listening to One Sweet Love by Sara Bareilles.
A nameless face to think I see
To sit and watch the waves with me till they’re gone
A heart I’d swear I’d recognize is
Made out of my own devices could I be wrong?
Ready and waiting (Ready and waiting)
For a heart worth the breaking (heart worth the breaking)
But I’d settle for an honest mistake in the name of
One sweet love

04.10.2017
©2017 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash
In response to Napowrimo Day 9
 
Finally, here is our prompt (optional, as always). Because today is the ninth day of NaPoWriMo, I’d like to challenge you to write a nine-line poem.

Read the rest of my Napowrimo 2017 poems here!

Winged-Queen

I whispered
for her to come out
but inside her hardened shell
she whispered
“wait up”.

And so I stayed
until she sees the
waiting world,
then today after
some wiggly wobbles
wiggly wobbles,
I watched her grand entrance
like a morning sun
being birth by beautiful dawn.

Flaunting her delicate gown
I knew she needs no crown.

She is the winged-queen.
Proudly birthed by cocoon’s grim.

04.05.2017
©2017 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash
In response to Napowrimo Day 5
 
In honor of Mary Oliver’s work, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that is based in the natural world: it could be about a particular plant, animal, or a particular landscape.
and dVerse‘s Does your dog wear a raincoat??? by lillian.
So, let’s talk about anthropomorphism today: the attribution of human traits, emotions, and intentions to nonhumans. Hmmm…how does that differ from personification? Literary Devices.net explains “…there is a slight difference between these two. Personification is an act of giving human characteristics to animals or objects to create imagery, while anthropomorphism aims to make an animal or object behave and appear like they are human beings.”

dverse

Read the rest of my Napowrimo 2017 poems here!

Elegy of Us

we will soon be nothing
but a fading memory

made of warm forehead kisses
filled with innocence,
tight hand-in-hand walks
oblivious to world’s mess,

comforting hugs on
toughest turns of time,
loud to soft exchanges of
angry then sweet rhymes,

endearing utterance of names
turning them into songs,
pregnant tears shed when for the first time
you wrote me a poem,

full plates of cuisines
we tried together,
promises of discovering
the truth in forever.

looking at your eyes for one last time,
holding your hands for one last time,
stare at my tears and feel my touch,
before our us turned into nothing
but a fading
m

e

m

o

r

y

04.03.2017
©2017 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash
In response to Napowrimo Day 3.
 
And now for our (optional) prompt! Today I’d like to challenge you to write an elegy – a poem that mourns or honors someone dead or something gone by. And I’d like to ask you to center the elegy on an unusual fact about the person or thing being mourned.

Read the rest of my Napowrimo 2017 poems here!

Stairs to Moving Forward

tears be
the balm
of the badly
bruised, beating
heart.
faith be
the calm
of the noisy,
full of fear
mind.
hope be
the song
of the silenced,
hunched, inner
hole.
Him be
the strong
of the weak
surrendering,
soul.

04.03.2017
©2017 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash
In response to Napowrimo Day 1 and Day 2.
 
I’d like to challenge you to write a Kay-Ryan-esque poem: short, tight lines, rhymes interwoven throughout, maybe an animal or two, and, if you can manage to stuff it in, a sharp little philosophical conclusion.
Today, I’d like you to write a poem inspired by, or in the form of, a recipe! It can be a recipe for something real, like your grandmother’s lemon chiffon cake, or for something imaginary, like a love potion or a spell.

Read the rest of my Napowrimo 2017 poems here!

Mahulog Sa’yo | Fall For You*

photo-1429277005502-eed8e872fe52

*Very first collaboration with the writer-best-friend I never got to have, my now proud Filipina blogger-best-friend and an equally gifted poetess and storyteller, Maria of Doodles and Scribbles.

She wrote the lovely Tagalog (language of the Philippines) poem and I tried translating it to English. ❤ Thank you for letting me do that, Maria. ❤


Mahulog Sa’yo | Fall For You

Sanay na akong nakasunod | I have always been
sa iyong mga yapak, | a follower of your steps,
At ang anino mo’y | Behind your shadows
pilit hinanagilap. | I have never left.

Kuntento na akong pagmasdan | It is enough for me to stare
sa likod ng pintuan, | behind silent closed doors,
Ang pagsilay ng iyong mga ngiti | Waiting for your sweet smile
na sa aking pagod ay pumapawi. | that erases my soul’s remorse.

Kaya, mahal, pakiusap ko lang, | To you my love I beg,
Hayaan mong ako’y magmahal, | Just let me love you,
sa lihim lamang. | inside hidden heart’s keg.

Wag mo akong dalhin sa tuktok | Don’t let me reach your heart’s peak
para lang iyong iwanan, | Only to wait for your absent heart beats.
Wag mo akong bigyan ng dahilan para isipinm | Don’t let my mind wonder,
na maaaring may pag-asa, | that we have a future to share,
na maaaring ako’y mahal mo rin pala | that you can love me too, oh dear.

Dahil kung sakali man | Cause just in case,
handa akong tumalon. | know that I’m willing to jump.
Handa akong mahulog para sa iyo. | From a high cliff towards you.
Handa akong mahulog sa iyo. | To fall even to death just to be with you.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash.com


In response to Napowrimo Day 30. (yes, I’m done catching up! :D)

 

And now our prompt (still optional!) Because we’ve spent our month looking at poets in English translation, today I’d like you to try your hand at a translation of your own. If you know a foreign language, you could take a crack at translating a poem by a poet writing in that language.

Read the rest of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!

 

Mother’s Choices: Two Kimo*

mother

Mother’s Choices: Two Kimo*
(A poem for the strongest woman I call Nanay)

She gave birth to a baby she called Rose.
Loving beyond borders, walls.
She somehow made the right choice.

Miles from home she ran with the man she loves.
Her beating heart overruled.
Her innocence captured.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to Napowrimo Day 28. (yes, I’m catching up! :D)

 

And now, for our prompt (optional, as always). Today I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that tells a story. But here’s the twist – the story should be told backwards. The first line should say what happened last, and work its way through the past until you get to the beginning. Now, the story doesn’t have to be complicated (it’s probably better if it isn’t)!

*Kimo

The Kimo is an Israeli version of the haiku, found at Poetry Kaleidoscope. There should be no movement in the imagery.

The Kimo is:

  • a tristich, a 3 line poem.
  • syllabic 10-7-6 syllables per line.
  • unrhymed.

Read more of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!

Woman’s Worth: A Cinq Trois Deca La Rhyme*

worth

Woman’s Worth: A Cinq Trois Deca La Rhyme*

Your staring wide grinning eyes consume the beauty I behold.
From my face to my toes you gaze as if I’m a shining gold.
Words will be futile, ‘cause your malicious gape speak for itself.
Dark dreamy, steamy scenes your mind creates, I can see myself.
Stop! For your soul’s sake put your vicious visions in state of dearth.
I have wise mind and kind heart, they are my assets since my birth.

I am more than flawless face and bare body that’re rare on earth,
I am more than the lustful illusions you can never hold,
I am more than the photo-shopped babe in your men’s cave bookshelf,
I’m more than what you can see and feel. No words can speak my worth.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to Napowrimo Day 27. (yes, I’m catching up! :D)

 

Today’s prompt comes to us from Megan Pattie, who points us to the work of the Irish poet Ciaran Carson, who increasingly writes using very long lines. Carson has stated that his lines are (partly) based on the seventeen syllables of the haiku, and that he strives to achieve the clarity of the haiku in each line. So today, Megan and I collectively challenge you to write a poem with very long lines.

*Cinq Trois Deca La Rhyme

Cinq Trois Deca La Rhyme is an invented form found at Shadow Poetry, created by Laura Lamarca. The Cinq Trois Deca La Rhyme is:

  • a decastich, a poem in 10 lines.
  • syllabic, 15 syllables per line.
  • rhymed, rhyme scheme aabbcccabc.

Read more of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!

Love Chant*

chant

Love Chant*

How do I love thee?
I’ll write you letters till your eyes cannot see.

How do I love thee?
I’ll reach you even in the deepest blue sea.

How do I love thee?
I’ll sing you songs till you can’t hear me.

How do I love thee?
I’ll command the stars to shine to you brightly.

How do I love thee?
I’ll hold your hand, till it’s gray and skinny.

How do I love thee?
I’ll tell the wind to breathe life to you endlessly.

How do I love thee?
I’ll remind you of our love, when your brain forgets about me.

How do I love thee?
I’ll stopped time, when your heartbeat dies slowly.

How do I love thee?
I can say more but nothing will ever be enough, to tell you…
How do I love thee.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to Napowrimo Day 26. (yes, I’m catching up! :D)

 

Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that incorporates a call and response. Calls-and-responses are used in many sermons and hymns (and also in sea chanties!), in which the preacher or singer asks a question or makes an exclamation, and the audience responds with a specific, pre-determined response.

*Chant

The Chant is from Latin cantus, meaning song, but this genre of verse dates back far beyond the days of Homer and Virgil. As most verse, it began as an oral tradition and it probably was heard echoing off the walls of cave dwellers in prehistoric times. The chant is verse in which a word, phrase, line and rhythm is repeated again and again. The repetition is strong and the rhythm hypnotic. But it didn’t get left behind in the caves, more modern verse forms or poetic genres have employed elements of the chant, such as the blues and slave or prison work songs.

The Chant is:

  • repetitive, usually a word, phrase, line, a rhythm is repeated over and over.
  • musical, it should contain a rhythmic beat.
  • written without a beginning, middle or end.
  • rhymed at the discretion of the poet.

Read more of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!

Sweet Sun: A Scallop*

scallop

Sweet Sun: A Scallop*

Sweet sun,
send me the moon.
Save soul slowly sinking,
steady sea I’m seeking,
where soul can soon
stay shun.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to Daily Post: Scars and Napowrimo Day 25. (yes, I’m catching up! :D)

 

Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that begins with a line from a another poem (not necessarily the first one), but then goes elsewhere with it.

The first two lines of this poem is from Sara Bareilles’ song: Send Me the Moon.

 

Darkness to light
Moved from day into night
To be near you
Still here I stand
I am sinking like sand
In your sea

Sweet sun
Send me the moon
Empty the skies out
Bringing me one step closer
To you
Send it soon
And I will breathe in, breathe out
‘Til you come in and out
Of view

*Scallop

The Scallop is an invented stanzaic form written in sixains. It was created by Marie L Blanche Adams.

The Scallop is:

  • stanzaic, written in any number of sixains.
  • syllabic, 2-4-6-6-4-2 syllables per line.
  • rhymed, rhyme scheme abccba deffed ghiihg etc.

Read more of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!

Former Performer: A Butterfly Verse*

butterfly

Former Performer: A Butterfly Verse*

Old man
with ebullience,
lives beneath rusty lamp,
beside rubbish, stinky trash dump.
Sudden
epiphany, with eloquence
he sings ethereally,
‘fore ephemeral
voice fades.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to Napowrimo Day 24. (yes, I’m catching up! :D)

 

Today I challenge you to write a “mix-and-match” poem in which you mingle fancy vocabulary with distinctly un-fancy words. First, spend five minutes writing a list of overly poetic words – words that you think just sound too high-flown to really be used by anyone in everyday speech.

*Butterfly Verse

Butterflies are shape poems. I am embarrassed to admit I found a few links to different Butterfly verse forms but when I went back to look more closely I keep getting an error. So although there is a Butterfly Septet and a Butterfly Kimo somewhere out there, right now I can’t give you any details. I was able to find a different site for the Butterfly Cinquain however. Here it is:

  • Butterfly Cinquain isn’t a cinquain at all:it is a nonostich (9 lines)and uses the syllable count of the Crapsey Cinquain and then reverses it, therefore the misnomer.
  • The Butterfly Cinquain is:
    • 9 line poem.
    • syllabic, 2-4-6-8-2-8-6-4-2 syllables per line.
    • unrhymed.

Read more of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!