earth’s striptease: a haiku

asphalt road in white,
absent leaves, abandoned twigs,
fresh year undresses.

12.16.2019
©2019 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash
For Frank’s #Haikai Challenge #117 (12/14/19): Midwinter (mafuyu)/Midsummer (manastu) #haiku #senryu #haibun #tanka #haiga #renga
My upcoming book, Poems for S is up for pre-order. See it here: https://amzn.to/2CSrGAU .
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Lost Lavender

Forgive me, my creator
but I feel you are a traitor,
for painting me with friendly color
and gifting me with healing odor,
but letting me be a protector
of a poisonous aggressor.

In this human court
judging me physically,
my defense is my fragrant grace,
and my pale petals’ serenity,
yet the prosecution argues
I am a symbol of distrust only—
my soft stalks cloaked in fallacy
is the home of fangs so deadly.

In between this irony,
who am I really?
I guess you have to tell me,
your humans are too divided,
I can’t trust them, I’m sorry.

05.02.2018
©2018 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash

Inspiration is the Lavender
Lavender
Serenity, Grace, Calmness,Distrust*
*Primary sentiment for “lavender” is based in the superstition that poisonous asps live under
lavender plants; therefore, “distrust” lavender plants. This is probably the most extreme example of a flower sentiment that is not really associated the actual flower blossom.
In response to dVerse The Language of Flowers

Senseless: A Sept*

Think
before
you start to
speak, curse, talk, judge.
Don’t be one
senseless
man.

Photo credit: Unsplash

In response to OctPoWriMo 2016 by Morgan Dragonwillow‘s Day 18.

The Sept is a simple invented form patterned after the number 7.

The Sept is:

  • a heptastich, a poem in 7 lines.
  • syllabic, 1-2-3-4-3-2-1 syllables in each line.
  • unrhymed.

In-depth: An Imayo

Autopsy my tender words, ‘fore you let them in.
They may sound sugary sweet, but better check ‘em.
In-depth they bleed dark curses— chocolate-coated.
Just like your false promises, bland and not buttered.

Photo credit: Unsplash

In response to OctPoWriMo 2016 by Morgan Dragonwillow‘s Day 16.

Imayo It seems that whenever I research a Japanese form, it involves an alternating 5-7 or 7-5 syllabic structure. The Imayo (present style) of the 12th century is no exception. This form creates long lines broken by caesura separating 7 and 5 syllables in the line.

The Imayo is associated with song, (recitation in a high pitch) and originated with the common people in folk song. But by the Heian period it was embraced by the Imperial court. This folk art evolved with the influence of Imperial aristocrats and famous courtesans or Shirabyoshi dancers incorporated the Imayo into their performances. One type of Imayo is used in Kabuki, Japanese theatre.

The Imayo is:

  • a 4 line poem.
  • syllabic, written in 12 syllable lines broken by caesura after the 7th syllable.

Tasty: A Tango

Words slipping through your sweet, lying tongue,
smell as fragrant as wildflowers in bloom.
But when they went inside my heart and my mind,
your tasty letters are cursed with unending gloom.

Photo credit: Unsplash

In response to OctPoWriMo 2016 by Morgan Dragonwillow‘s Day 6.


The Tango is an invented stanzaic form introduced by Chiquita LoJuana Gonzolas Sills.

The Tango is:

  • stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains.
  • syllabic, 9-10-11-12 syllables per line.
  • rhymed, xaxa xbxb etc. x being unrhymed.

Sharp: A Shadorma*

Powerful
tongue as sharp as sword.
Spit slashing
strong words of
life, death, destruction and hope.
Please use it wisely.

Photo credit: Unsplash

In response to OctPoWriMo 2016 by Morgan Dragonwillow‘s Day 5.

The Shadorma is a simple syllabic verse form Theated by James Neill Northe that is most effective when written using strong words or phrases.

The Shadorma is:

  • a hexastich, a poem in 6 lines although you certainly could choose to write any number of sixains in this syllabic pattern.
  • syllabic, 3-5-3-3-7-5 syllables per line.
  • Unrhymed.

Petrichor

9

Petrichor: A Pleiades*

Prairie’s wet with sky’s tears,
praline buds are mist-kissed,
praying dry twigs now cheered,
prams can now be released,
powerful storm’s appeased.
Prelude’s done, dear rainbow—
play with sweet petrichor.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

Word Inspiration: Sarah Doughty of Heartstring Eulogies (Thanks, Sarah!)


*Pleiades

The Pleiades is:

  • a heptastich, a poem in 7 lines.
  • syllabic, each line is 6 syllables.
  • titled with a single word.
  • composed with each line beginning with the same letter as the beginning letter of the title.  

Illicitous

8

Illicitous: An Imayo*

Blurred eyes missed your intense gaze, as I come near you.
Your face’s illicitous look, reveals your soul’s crooked.
Your dark eyes take off my clothes, but I keep my stance.
I know my womanhood’s worth, you’ll ne’er stand a chance!

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

Word Inspiration: Sarah Doughty of Heartstring Eulogies (Thank you, Sarah!)


*Imayo

It seems that whenever I research a Japanese form, it involves an alternating 5-7 or 7-5 syllabic structure. The Imayo (present style) of the 12th century is no exception. This form creates long lines broken by caesura separating 7 and 5 syllables in the line.

The Imayo is:

  • a 4 line poem.
  • syllabic, written in 12 syllable lines broken by caesura after the 7th syllable.

Ethereal

7

Ethereal: An Endecha*

our earth’s ethereal facade
made of seasons’ artistry,
fades out before my two eyes
when it ate your body wholly, including me.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

Word Inspiration: Sarah Doughty of Heartstring Eulogies (Thanks, Sarah!)


*Endecha

The Endecha is a ” The Canción triste que encierra un lamento”, (“sad song that locks up a moan”), a 16th century Spanish dirge or song of sorrow.

The Endecha is:

  • stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains.
  • syllabic, written with 7-7-7-11 syllables per line.
  • rhymed, rhyme scheme xaxa xbxb etc., x being unrhymed. The rhyme is often consonance only but true rhyme may be used.