t w o w o r l d s

Find me in silent
corners where the
horizon’s mouth
swallows another
burning ball,
licks the cool sky
in pastel blush
in front of all.

Find me in soft,
tender nighttime
blanket, sipping a
the third cup of my
daily coffee haul.

Find me inside the
chosen shell of
solitude where
thoughts are
slowly eaten,
gingerly chewed.

Find me on the lap
of whistling rhymes
and twirling rhythms,

for I live in two worlds—
the real and the written.

09.25.2019
©2019 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo by Thought Catalog on Unsplash

b o t t o m l e s s (a pantoum)

Sip those sunsets, time isn’t bottomless.
Let that cold wind kiss your deep dark tresses,
while your soul sinks with ‘nother day’s eggress.
Sshh, be still, as evening sky undresses.

Let that cold wind kiss your deep dark tresses.
Tired feet, be bare, let dusts be your toes guests.
Shh, be still, as evening sky undresses.
Solace’s not a clear map, it’s a wild quest.

Tired feet, be bare, let dusts be your toes guests,
tough, thick skin is formed with sharp thorns’ scratches.
Solace’s not a clear map, it’s a wild quest.
You’re never lost, this earth is your address.

Tough, thick skin is formed with sharp thorns’ scratches—
scars of blood-golds, only you can possess.
Yes, you’re never lost. This earth’s your address.
Sip those sunsets. Time isn’t bottomless.

03.18.2019
©2019 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo by Cristina Gottardi on Unsplash

Inspired by dVerse Poetry–a Piece of Written Art.
My second try on dear Gina’s of Singledust prompt:
*Pantoum
The pantoum is a poetic form derived from the pantun, a Malay verse form: specifically from the pantun berkait, a series of interwoven quatrains and rhyming couplets.
Basic structure
It is similar to a villanelle with repeating lines throughout the poem. It is composed of a series of quatrains; the second and fourth lines of each stanza are repeated as the first.
The pattern continues for any number of stanzas, except for the final stanza, which differs in the repeating pattern.
The first and third lines of the last stanza are the second and fourth of the penultimate; the first line of the poem is the last line of the final stanza, and the third line of the first stanza is the second of the final.
Ideally, the meaning of lines shifts when they are repeated although the words remain exactly the same: this can be done by shifting punctuation, punning, or simply recontextualizing.
A four-stanza pantoum is common (although more may be used), and in the final stanza, lines one and three from the first stanza can be repeated, or new lines can be written.
The basic pantoum form is as follows:
Stanza 1
A
B
C
D
Stanza 2
B
E
D
F
Stanza 3
E
G
F
H
Stanza 4
G
C
H
A

Last Echo

she got the final note
on her last day
on earth.
she went out
with a book on hand
and let the last echo
of her heart
lead her between
the mountain, the sky
where her song is heard,
where her name is whispered.

P.S. Written with India Arie’s India Song playing. ❤
I wanna go where the mountains are high enough to echo my song
I wanna go where the rivers run deep enough to drown my shame
I wanna go where the stars shine bright enough to show me the way
I wanna go where the wind calls my name

05.09.2017
©2017 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash

In response to Quadrille #32 by whimsygizmo
Let’s dance with some shadows today, my poetical peeps. This is De Jackson, aka WhimsyGizmo, and it’s Quadrille Monday here at the bar – when we write a poem of exactly 44 words (not including title), and include one given word.
Today, I want you to play with the word: echo.
dverse

Falling

slowly drifting,
silently sinking,
gradually calming,
million cells shouting.

welcoming blackness,
embracing blankness,
letting mind rest,
leaving world’s mess.

12.09.2015
©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer

Photo credit: Link
Originally written for Blogging University’s WRITING 101: Intro to Poetry Day 3 Assignment.