Melancholy

28

Melancholy: A Musette*

I’ve tried
melancholy,
I died.

You gave
me bliss for free,
I’m saved.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

Word Inspiration: Sarah Doughty of Heartstring Eulogies (Thank you, Sarah!)


*The Musette is an invented verse form that presents the challenge of writing in very short lines. This form was introduced by Emily Romano and found only at Shadow Poetry. The Musette is:

  • stanzaic, written in any number of tercets.
  • syllabic, 2-4-2 2-4-2 2-4-2 syllables per line.
  • rhymed axa bxb cxc etc. x being unrhymed.

Resurrection

27

Resurrection: A Rispetto*

I am a dried weightless leaf flying.
I am a hole with no signs of life.
I am a stone no one’s noticing.
I am a deep sea no man can dive.

You are the twig that rescues dead leaf.
You are the air that fills holes too swift.
You are the ocean that hugs cold stones.
You are the brave man who saved my bones.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

Word Inspiration: Sarah Doughty of Heartstring Eulogies (Thank you, Sarah!)


 

*Rispetto is a 15th century Italian verse form still popular today. It is usually a love poem, hence the name “respect” for a loved one. It is thought to be a descendant of the Tuscan Strombotto.

The Rispetto is:

  • a poem in 8 lines, an octave, made up of 2 quatrains.
  • in English most often written in iambic tetrameter or it can be syllabic with lines between 8 and 12 syllables from its Italian roots.
  • rhymed ababccdd or abababcc or abab cddc.

Delved: A Diamante

Diamante

Delved: A Diamante
©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer


Lost
clueless, numb
searching, waiting, hoping
blank… futile… alive… real…
ending, mending, reaching
rescued, saved
Found.

Photo credit: Aaron Burden


In response to Blogging from A to Z Challenge: D is for Diamante

Diamante

A Diamante is a seven-lined contrast poem set up in a diamond shape.

Line 1: Noun or subject
Line 2: Two Adjectives describing the first noun/subject
Line 3: Three -ing words describing the first noun/subject
Line 4: Four words: two about the first noun/subject, two about the antonym/synonym
Line 5: Three -ing words about the antonym/synonym
Line 6: Two adjectives describing the antonym/synonym
Line 7: Antonym/synonym for the subject

Missed a letter/poem? Read all Poetry from A-Z here.