5 Quotes Why I Love A Man Called Ove

A Man Called Ove

A 59-year old widower. Grumpy. Trying and failing to kill himself, many times. Here’s an odd, funny, yet utterly moving story.

A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman

Rating: ❤❤❤❤

The first novel by the Swedish author Fredrik Backman, A Man Called Ove is a balance between heart wrenching and thought provoking lines as well as chuckle-inducing dialogues.

Backman has successfully created an old character who’s relatable to all ages. He eloquently presented Ove as the sad and odd man that he is, yet he successfully and ever so gently laid down his main character’s back story. His love. His grief. The reason why a man called Ove is the man called Ove.

Here are five (05) of my (many) favorite lines from this worth-reading novel.

  1. “He was a man of black and white. And she was color. All the color he had.”

  2. “One of the most painful moments in a person’s life probably comes with the insight that an age has been reached when there is more to look back on than ahead. And when time no longer lies ahead of one, other things have to be lived for. memories, perhaps.”
  3. “But sorrow is unreliable in that way. When people don’t share it there’s a good chance that it will drive them apart instead.”

  4. “All people at root are time optimists. We always think there’s enough time to do things with other people. Time to say things to them. And then something happens and then we stand there holding on to words like ‘if’.”
  5. “It is difficult to admit that one is wrong. Particularly when one has ben wrong for a very long time.”

  6. “Loving someone is like moving into a house,” Sonja used to say. “At first you fall in love with all the new things, amazed every morning that all this belongs to you, as if fearing that someone would suddenly come rushing in through the door to explain that a terrible mistake had been made, you weren’t actually supposed to live in a wonderful place like this. Then over the years the walls become weathered, the wood splinters here and there, and you start to love that house not so much because of all its perfection, but rather for its imperfections. You get to know all the nooks and crannies. How to avoid getting the key caught in the lock when it’s cold outside. Which of the floorboards flex slightly when one steps on them or exactly how to open the wardrobe doors without them creaking. These are the little secrets that make it your home.”

©2018 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photos via Goodreads and Unsplash
Advertisements

Come In

more often than not,
i find myself tucked
in between
crumpled sheets
of bed
and book
inside a well-lit
room,
with a cuppa
black and hot
coffee
on the side,
paired with a blank
page
waiting, expecting
for the sudden flow of
ink,
as i breathe in
and out
words.

come in,
join my community
of letters,
commas,
periods,
lines,
and rhymes.

with words, we are never alone.

04.26.2017
©2017 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash

In response to dVerse‘s Community by paul scribbles.
Today, write us a postcard poem.
Hello everyone, this is Paul welcoming you to the bar on my first night as an ‘official’ member of the team.
Thank You All for affording me such a warm invitation into this community of poets.
I am honored and humbled in equal measure.
So it is with no surprise then that my first official bar prompt for this Tuesday Poetics night is to be ‘Community.’

dverse

READS: The Writer’s Guide to Poetry

For the nth time, I said for me, “writing is like breathing with words”. But as I read more and more and write more and more, I realize there is so much learning to do to be able to “breathe” better.

As Stephen King said in his awesome book On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft, “If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.”

Confession time: Since November, I have not finished a single book after finishing 60 from January to October 2016. I am on a reading block but I have not stopped reading poetry. I read some works of Maya Angelou, Charles Bukowski, Emily Dickinson and I promise myself I will read more.

Because I want to grow in this word-made field of poetry. I want to write better. I want to breathe better.

Then recently, I received an email about this awesome poetry guide titled The Writer’s Guide to Poetry by Signature, Knopf and Penguin Random House.

In it you’ll find:

  • Insights from 11 award-winning poets.
  • Advice on how to overcome imposter syndrome.
  • 3 classic poems illustrated by artist Nathan Gelgud.
  • Anne Lamott on the devils of perfectionism.
  • Important tips on “telling it slant.”
  • And more.

I will be reading this book this Lenten Break and if you want to get your copy visit here.

Happy reading and writing, my darlings! ❤

Ten Reasons Why I Love Reading

photo-1421338443272-0dde2463976a

It’s calming.
It’s quiet.
It’s easy to concentrate.
It’s like dreaming while awake.
It’s a guiltless delight.
It’s like munching a calorie-less cake.
It’s sleep-inducing.
It’s detoxifying.
It’s poetically inspiring.
It’s just… the best thing.

Photo Credit: Unsplash


In response to The Broke and the Bookish‘s Top Ten Tuesday today:

June 7: Ten Reasons I Love X — could be a certain book, character, author, your indie bookstore, a fandom, a tv show, reading, a hobby, a genre.

P.S. Why do you love reading? Do we have the same reasons? Let me know!:)

~