blanket and shame (a dizain*)

Still wrapped in blanket of soft innocence,
like a butterfly fresh from its cocoon,
a young breath given too short existence
by evil desire of a maniac goon.
A lifeless, cold shell wimps a wordless croon.

An animal act, perhaps it is not,
for mammals, reptiles, these kingdoms just ought
to kill to survive. But humans, we have
become brainless, salivating, cracked nuts,
drowned by earth’s urges, a shame of Above.

My lines bleed for the one-year-old boy raped and murdered by a drunk man in my motherland, the Philippines. My heart breaks. My soul is burning with rage. Why. Why. Why. What have we become. What have we become.

07.19.2019
©2019 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo by Henry & Co. on Unsplash
For dVerse Poetry Form: Dizain 
Brief History
The *dizain is a 10-line form which – like so many good ones – originated in France. It was popular there in the 15th and 16 Centuries, and has also been used by such famous English poets as John Keats and Philip Sidney.
Basic Structure
The basic rules for the dizain are that it has one stanza consisting of 10 lines, with 10 syllables per line, and the rhyme scheme is ababbccdcd. Do you see how the second half of the stanza sort of mirrors the rhyme scheme of the first? Not using the same rhymes,but reversing the sequence. It’s more obvious if I make a break between sections: ababb ccdcd – though the poem is not usually written with a break.

patawad, Pilipinas (forgive me, Philippines)

Patawad, Pilipinas
Hindi ako makakaboto bukas.
Ang mga paa ko’y nakaapak
sa isang malayong landas.
Kumakayod para sa pamilyang
hugutan ng lakas.

Subalit, Pilipinas,
dinig ko ang iyong hikbi.
Umiiyak din ang aking puso,
na para bang ako’y sawi
sa nakikitang mga pangalang
sa malamang ay magwawagi.

Oo, Pilipinas,
mahina ako sa Filipino.
Sa simpleng ng at nang
ako nga ay litong-lito,
subalit hinding hindi
sa mga taong dapat iboto.

Oo, Pilipinas,
nagtatanong din ako
kung bakit nga ba mas marami
ang boboto sa mga manloloko.
Marahil mas mainam ang kilala
kesa sa mga bago.

Oo, Pilipinas,
nakakatakot nga ang bukas.
Marahil may himala,
baka matalo ang likong pantas.
Baka ang nag-iisip,
sa wakas ay magsilabas.

Patawad pa rin, Pilipinas
hindi ako makakaboto bukas.
Baunin mo ang aking dasal
mula sa malayong landas.
Kainin ka man ng dilim bukas,
Pilipinas, hindi ito ang wakas.


Translation:

Forgive me, Philippines,
I cannot vote tomorrow.
My feet are stepped on
a far land where calm winds blow,
working for my family
the home where my strength grow.

But, Philippines,
I can hear you wimping.
My heart cries with you
like I am also breaking
to see those names
whom most may be voting.

Yes, Philippines,
my Filipino skills isn’t good.
In simple use of “ng” and “nang”,
I’m like lost in the woods,
but not on who to vote
for your greater good.

Yes, Philippines,
I am also wondering
why a lot will vote
for experts in plundering.
Perhaps old names are better
than a new beginning.

Yes, Philippines,
tomorrow is quite scary.
Perhaps, there’s miracle,
the fools will lose, maybe.
Perhaps those who think
will be heard finally.

Still, I am sorry, Philippines
I cannot vote tomorrow.
Please bring with you my prayers
from a far land where calm winds blow.
Even if the darkness wins tomorrow,
Philippines, this isn’t your end, no.

05.12.2019
©2019 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo by Jeremy Perret on Unsplash

Please help me pray for my country.

m y c a r r i e r

Elevated eyes can see the throngs of the wheeled machines this morning. Like row of soldiers, though not marching nor moving under the 9 a.m. sun burning.

Feet need not to tiptoe to see the jeepneys, cars, and buses, wearing the colors of the vibrant Philippines, yet tainted with the grey blanket of Manila’s dust and dirt. Honking to complain of the many minutes wasted, as if noise can widen the paved yet narrow road.

After a few steps from the rusted footbridge to the equally rugged jeep destined to be my carrier today, I embarked on my own journey to start the day’s routine. Perhaps, vehicles are armies with different passengers and captains.

Tired rubber wheels screech
against sunbathed, asphalt road,
destination reached.

10.02.2018
©2018 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash

For dVerse Haibun Monday: Murmuration.

Damp Box

The box made of
thin tree-meat walls,
closed by a
curtain door,
sealed with
hole-filled, rusted
roof, again
sinks under the
merciless river
overflow, yet

the eight hearts
it has been carrying
will remain afloat—

with warm love,
with fearless faith,
with ceaseless hope.

08.14.2018
©2018 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash

For dVerse Quadrille #62.
Please pray for flood victims in Kerala, India and in the Philippines (including me).

foggy borders

splat!
goes the blood
and some threads
of bleeding muscles
from his back
to the waiting
concrete wall.

bang!
goes the bullet
as cold as the heart
who pulled the trigger
to put the 17-year-old
to his final, breathless
sleep.

no more!
goes some mouths
to condemn the
brutal purging
and killing
and planting of
fired-guns and drugs
to the hands
none can know if
innocent or not.

i now wonder
where is the
foggy border
between justice
and injustice,
instant law and
due process?

maybe the
monsoon shower
will soon wash away
the kiss of blood
on that cold wall,
maybe our minds
are also fogged
by the mist of
hazy judgments
as we silently ask:
“can these killings
save us all?”

Some thoughts after another brutal killing, part of the Philippine government’s war on drugs. Sigh. Sigh.
08.23.2017
©2017 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo by Neven Krcmarek on Unsplash

In response to Poetics: Border by Grace
My prompt today is about border, that line separating two political or geographical areas, especially countries, or the outer part or edge. More than the physcial boundaries, there are borders which are invisible, such as an imaginary, social or mental borders. These kind of borders are more challening to overcome, don’t you agree?
dverse

booms and bangs

boom!
crumbles the church the city prayed.

bang!
rings the house of an old friend.

boom!
explodes a truck, bodies sprayed.

bang!
runs peace, hope, in a rushed parade.

between the booms, bangs
i plead above
let this bad dream be
cursed and damned.

This is a fictional poem inspired by the still unending war in Marawi, the only Islamic city in the Philippines. I can never fathom the reasons of these groups in killing not just lives but the hopes, the future of the children left clueless and helpless in the middle of this war. May peace blossom again in this corner of my country.

08.15.2017
©2017 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash

In response to Quadrille #38 by whimsygizmo.

Today, I want us to DREAM together.

City’s Chaos

My ears hate the scandalous honking cars and buses. My eyes are hurt by the sight of children sleeping beside roads and under bridges. My nose are irate with the stinky smell of cigarette and engine smoke. My tongue can taste the bitterness this city’s chaos spoke. Yet my skin can feel the powerful tingle of my dream-burning bones.

Hellish oh surely,
for dreamers it’s heavenly.
Work hard, play harder.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo credit: Unsplash

In response to dVerse‘s Haibun Monday #23 – contemporary cityscape by Björn Rudberg (brudberg) who wrote Cityscape Anatomy.

dverse

Word-High July: Welcome!

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July is right on our door steps and it’ll enter with Word-High July! Maria of Doodles and Scribbles and I are more than excited to read your takes on the 30 Beautiful Filipino Words.

To welcome you all, let me introduce everyone to everyone (okay, I am not sure if I made any sense. :D). Hmm.

Here are the lovely bloggers who conveyed their interest in joining Word-High July:

WELCOME EVERYONE! 😀

Before you hop on here are the five easy steps to join Word-High July:

  1. Write or create a post inspired or about the Filipino word prompts.
  2. A post can be anything. A poem, a fiction, a six-word tale, or even a photo. It’s all up to you.
  3. Linkback/create a pingback to this post: Word-High July 30 Beautiful Filipino Words. Here is a quick tutorial on how to do a pingback.
  4. Tag your post with WordHighJuly, so your co-bloggers will be able to read/see your take on the prompt. Here’s how you create tags.
  5. Most important of all, read and comment to your blogger friends (old and new found, we’ll never know).😉

HOP ON and let’s all GET WORD-HIGH this JULY!

Word-High July: 30 Beautiful Filipino Words

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Much like the colors of the skies, every language is beautiful in its own way—the way they sound and how each word fits perfectly in a poem, a story, or a musical piece. And sometimes we find ourselves wishing how delightful it would be if we could learn those languages by heart and use them in our craft.

That is why Maria of Doodles and Scribbles and Rosema of A Reading Writer have invited you to join their July blog event, Word-High July. They have teamed up to give you a whole month worth of prompts and since we are both #ProudlyPinay, these 30 beautiful Filipino words below will serve as the prompt for each day of the month.

Disclaimer: These words and these photos are from a lovely article by BuzzFeed titled “36 Of The Most Beautiful Words In The Philippine Language”. All credits goes to them.

July 1

July 1

July 2

July 2

July 3

july 3

July 4

july 4

July 5

july 5

July 6

july 6

July 7

july 7

July 8

july 8

July 09

july 9

July 10

july 10

July 11

july 11

July 12

july 12

July 13

july 13

July 14

july 14

July 15

july 15

July 16

july 16

July 17

july 17

July 18

july 18

July 19

july 19

July 20

july 20

July 21

july 21

July 22

july 22

July 23

july 23

July 24

july 24

July 25

july 25

July 26

july 26

July 27

july 27

July 28

july 28

July 29

july 29

July 30

july 30


Here are the five easy steps to join Word-High July:

  1. Write or create a post inspired or about the Filipino word prompts.
  2. A post can be anything. A poem, a fiction, a six-word tale, or even a photo. It’s all up to you.
  3. Linkback/create a pingback to this post. Here is a quick tutorial on how to do it.
  4. Tag your post with WordHighJuly, so your co-bloggers will be able to read/see your take on the prompt. Here’s how you create tags.
  5. Most important of all, read and comment to your blogger friends (old and new found, we’ll never know). 😉

Come join Maria and Rosema in appreciating the beauty of the Filipino language.

Let the #WordHighJuly commence! ✌️

Invitation to Join: Word-High July

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Words can light fires in the minds of men. Words can wring tears from the hardest hearts.”  ― Patrick Rothfuss, The Name of the Wind


On that note, let Maria of Doodles and Scribbles and Rosema of A Reading Writer introduce you to their first-ever word challenge called: Word-High July.

What is it?

Word-High July is a 30-day word challenge that will start on July 1, Friday and will end on July 30, Sunday. If you are familiar with the Blogging from A to Z Challenge and May Book Prompts, then it’s the same. 🙂

What’s special about it?

Because Maria and Rosema are both  from the Philippines and are both #ProudlyPinay, Word-High July will be featuring 30 Beautiful Filipino words as prompts for the rest of the month.

This is their way of introducing their little country to their beloved blogger friends. Thus, they hope you can join. 😉

How can I sign up?

Word-High July has no sign-up required. Maria and Rosema want it to be as open and as easy as possible.

How will I join?

Here are the five easy steps:

  1. Write or create a post inspired or about the Filipino word prompts.
  2. A post can be anything. A poem, a fiction, a six-word tale, or even a photo. It’s all up to you.
  3. Linkback/create a pingback to this post. Here is a quick tutorial on how to do it.
  4. Tag your post with WordHighJuly, so your co-bloggers will be able to read/see your take on the prompt. Here’s how you create tags.
  5. Most important of all, read and comment to your blogger friends (old and new found, we’ll never know). 😉

What are those 30 Filipino words?

The list will be published soon so you can start ahead of time and schedule your posts! Rest assured that the meaning of each word will be included in the list, too. 🙂

If you have any questions or suggestions, Maria and Rosema are more than excited to answer  and read them!

Please feel free to share and reblog this post. ❤

Thank you!