Book Bloggers I Almost-Always Bookmark

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“We read to know we’re not alone.” ― William Nicholson, Shadowlands


I am a book blogger
because my beloved novels
are a delight to share,
then I discovered
these lovely writers/readers
whose love for books
I am ensnared.

1. Jenna of Reading with Jenna

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2. Cristina of Tiny Obsessions

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3. Kat of Life and Other Disasters

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4. Leslie of Leslie Hauser

5. Yvo of It’s All About Books

6. Chrissi of Chrissi Reads

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7. Giovanna of Book Coma Blog

8. The Girl in Boots of Being a Book Nerd

Being A Book Nerd

9. Alicia of  A Kernel of Nonsense

10. Alyssa of Book Club Babe

Photo credit: Goes to the Blog Owners! 🙂


In response to The Broke and the Bookish‘s Top Ten Tuesday today:

April 5: Ten Bookish People You Should Follow On — – you pick the platform of your choice to talk about all the interesting bookish people to follow!

 

~

 

Ten Spring-Reads I’m Excited to Peruse

12c69-toptentuesday“It is spring again. The earth is like a child that knows poems by heart.” ― Rainer Maria Rilke


We have no spring
yet I’ve got good books
that will bring
some golden sunshine,
oh, stories divine,
that erases gloom,
as spring flowers
bloom.

1. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice

When Elizabeth Bennet first meets eligible bachelor Fitzwilliam Darcy, she thinks him arrogant and conceited; he is indifferent to her good looks and lively mind. When she later discovers that Darcy has involved himself in the troubled relationship between his friend Bingley and her beloved sister Jane, she is determined to dislike him more than ever. In the sparkling comedy of manners that follows, Jane Austen shows the folly of judging by first impressions and superbly evokes the friendships, gossip and snobberies of provincial middle-class life.

2. More Than This by Patrick Ness

More Than This

A boy drowns, desperate and alone in his final moments. He dies.

Then he wakes, naked and bruised and thirsty, but alive.

How can this be? And what is this strange deserted place?

As he struggles to understand what is happening, the boy dares to hope. Might this not be the end? Might there be more to this life, or perhaps this afterlife?

3. The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

The Girl on the Train

Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. “Jess and Jason,” she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.

And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

4. Amy and Isabelle by Elizabeth Strout

Amy and Isabelle

In most ways, Isabelle and Amy are like any mother and her 16-year-old daughter, a fierce mix of love and loathing exchanged in their every glance. And eating, sleeping, and working side by side in the gossip-ridden mill town of Shirley Falls doesn’t help matters. But when Amy is discovered behind the steamed-up windows of a car with her math teacher, the vast and icy distance between mother and daughter becomes unbridgeable.

5. The Ice Twins by S.K. Tremayne

The Ice Twins

A year after one of their identical twin daughters, Lydia, dies in an accident, Angus and Sarah Moorcraft move to the tiny Scottish island Angus inherited from his grandmother, hoping to put together the pieces of their shattered lives.

But when their surviving daughter, Kirstie, claims they have mistaken her identity—that she, in fact, is Lydia—their world comes crashing down once again.

As winter encroaches, Angus is forced to travel away from the island for work, Sarah is feeling isolated, and Kirstie (or is it Lydia?) is growing more disturbed. When a violent storm leaves Sarah and her daughter stranded, Sarah finds herself tortured by the past—what really happened on that fateful day one of her daughters died?

6. After You (Me Before You, #2) by Jojo Moyes

After You (Me Before You, #2)

How do you move on after losing the person you loved? How do you build a life worth living?

Louisa Clark is no longer just an ordinary girl living an ordinary life. After the transformative six months spent with Will Traynor, she is struggling without him. When an extraordinary accident forces Lou to return home to her family, she can’t help but feel she’s right back where she started.

Her body heals, but Lou herself knows that she needs to be kick-started back to life. Which is how she ends up in a church basement with the members of the Moving On support group, who share insights, laughter, frustrations, and terrible cookies. They will also lead her to the strong, capable Sam Fielding—the paramedic, whose business is life and death, and the one man who might be able to understand her. Then a figure from Will’s past appears and hijacks all her plans, propelling her into a very different future. . . .

7. Attachments by Rainbow Rowell

Attachments

Beth Fremont and Jennifer Scribner-Snyder know that somebody is monitoring their work e-mail. (Everybody in the newsroom knows. It’s company policy.) But they can’t quite bring themselves to take it seriously. They go on sending each other endless and endlessly hilarious e-mails, discussing every aspect of their personal lives.

Meanwhile, Lincoln O’Neill can’t believe this is his job now- reading other people’s e-mail. When he applied to be “internet security officer,” he pictured himself building firewalls and crushing hackers- not writing up a report every time a sports reporter forwards a dirty joke.

When Lincoln comes across Beth’s and Jennifer’s messages, he knows he should turn them in. But he can’t help being entertained-and captivated-by their stories.

By the time Lincoln realizes he’s falling for Beth, it’s way too late to introduce himself.

8. Every Last Word by Tamara Ireland Stone

Every Last Word

If you could read my mind, you wouldn’t be smiling.

Samantha McAllister looks just like the rest of the popular girls in her junior class. But hidden beneath the straightened hair and expertly applied makeup is a secret that her friends would never understand: Sam has Purely-Obsessional OCD and is consumed by a stream of dark thoughts and worries that she can’t turn off.

Second-guessing every move, thought, and word makes daily life a struggle, and it doesn’t help that her lifelong friends will turn toxic at the first sign of a wrong outfit, wrong lunch, or wrong crush. Yet Sam knows she’d be truly crazy to leave the protection of the most popular girls in school. So when Sam meets Caroline, she has to keep her new friend with a refreshing sense of humor and no style a secret, right up there with Sam’s weekly visits to her psychiatrist.

Caroline introduces Sam to Poet’s Corner, a hidden room and a tight-knit group of misfits who have been ignored by the school at large. Sam is drawn to them immediately, especially a guitar-playing guy with a talent for verse, and starts to discover a whole new side of herself. Slowly, she begins to feel more “normal” than she ever has as part of the popular crowd . . . until she finds a new reason to question her sanity and all she holds dear.

9. Room by Emma Donoghue

Room

To five-year-old Jack, Room is the entire world. It is where he was born and grew up; it’s where he lives with his Ma as they learn and read and eat and sleep and play. At night, his Ma shuts him safely in the wardrobe, where he is meant to be asleep when Old Nick visits.

Room is home to Jack, but to Ma, it is the prison where Old Nick has held her captive for seven years. Through determination, ingenuity, and fierce motherly love, Ma has created a life for Jack. But she knows it’s not enough…not for her or for him. She devises a bold escape plan, one that relies on her young son’s bravery and a lot of luck. What she does not realize is just how unprepared she is for the plan to actually work.

10. Why Not Me? by Mindy Kaling

Why Not Me?

In Why Not Me?, Kaling shares her ongoing journey to find contentment and excitement in her adult life, whether it’s falling in love at work, seeking new friendships in lonely places, attempting to be the first person in history to lose weight without any behavior modification whatsoever, or most important, believing that you have a place in Hollywood when you’re constantly reminded that no one looks like you.

Photo credit and summary: Goodreads


In response to The Broke and the Bookish‘s Top Ten Tuesday today:

March 15: Ten Books On My Spring TBR

P.S. What will you be reading this spring? 🙂

Tell me? 😀

~

2016 Reading Challenge Update: Part 2

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Before the year ‘leaped’, I was able to read four more books for this month. (My first update for February is here.)

So here are the awesome novels that I have read on and before the 29th. ❤

13th – A classic from the 20th century – To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird

What is it about: Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, To Kill A Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior—to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos. Now with over 18 million copies in print and translated into forty languages, this regional story by a young Alabama woman claims universal appeal. Harper Lee always considered her book to be a simple love story. Today it is regarded as a masterpiece of American literature.

What I Love: The depth of the the topic told in an innocent view is just flawless. Now I know the meaning of ‘classic’

What I Don’t Love Much: Honestly, the pace of the first few chapters are a bit slooooow for me.

Wise Words: 

“I never loved to read. One does not love breathing.”

“Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us not to try to win.”

“People in their right minds never take pride in their talents.”

Rating: 💖 💖 💖  💖 (Good read, definitely!)

14th – A YA bestseller – Ten Thousand Truths by Susan White

Ten Thousand Truths

What is it about: “Thirteen-year-old Rachel is bad news, or so her foster care worker tells her. She’s been shuttled from one rotten foster family to another ever since her mother and brother died in a car accident five years ago, and she’s running out of options. So when she gets caught shoplifting and is kicked out of her latest home, the only place left to send her is the last resort for kids like her; a farm in the middle of nowhere run by a disfigured recluse named Amelia Walton, whom Rachel names ‘Warty’ because of the strange lumps covering her face and neck.

Rachel settles into life on the farm, losing herself in daily chores and Amelia’s endless trivia and trying to forget her past and the secret she’s holding inside. But when a letter arrives for her out of the blue, Rachel soon realizes that you can’t hide from your past – or your future.”

What I Love: The descriptions of the lovely farm is just so vivid that it felt I was also there.

The literal ten thousand truths are both entertaining and informative.

What I Don’t Love Much: It is a bit short of that ‘oomph’. That feeling which give readers a book hangover.

Wise Words:

“Most of the beliefs in our shortcomings are spoken much louder from within than from anyone else.”

Rating: 💖 💖 💖 💖 (Good read, definitely!)

15th – A satirical book – Macarthur by Bob Ong

Macarthur

What is it about: A group of four boys with lives ‘destroyed’ in different ways but are united in ‘drugs’ and in a strong friendship bond.

What I Love: Powerfully written. The language used are explicit yet so real. The twists are jaw-dropping and saddening. The subtle way of tackling friendship within a group of ‘addict’ boys are heartwarming.

What I Don’t Love Much: None.

Rating: 💖 💖 💖 💖 💖 (GREAT read!)

16th – A science-fiction novel – The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

The Ocean at the End of the Lane

What is it about: Sussex, England. A middle-aged man returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral. Although the house he lived in is long gone, he is drawn to the farm at the end of the road, where, when he was seven, he encountered a most remarkable girl, Lettie Hempstock, and her mother and grandmother. He hasn’t thought of Lettie in decades, and yet as he sits by the pond (a pond that she’d claimed was an ocean) behind the ramshackle old farmhouse, the unremembered past comes flooding back. And it is a past too strange, too frightening, too dangerous to have happened to anyone, let alone a small boy.

Forty years earlier, a man committed suicide in a stolen car at this farm at the end of the road. Like a fuse on a firework, his death lit a touchpaper and resonated in unimaginable ways. The darkness was unleashed, something scary and thoroughly incomprehensible to a little boy. And Lettie—magical, comforting, wise beyond her years—promised to protect him, no matter what.

What I Love: I am no fan of fantasy and the ‘unplanned’ reading of this novel showed me I can love that genre, too.

Neil Gaiman is indeed a skill-full storyteller who can make you angry and scared. His words in this novel are short yet alive.

What I Don’t Love Much: None. 🙂

Wise Words: 

“Books were safe than other people anyway.”

Rating: 💖 💖 💖 💖 💖 (GREAT read!)

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Pop SugarGoodreads, Quote Fancy, Board of Wisdom and Like Success

Story Summary: Goodreads


What are you favorite reads last month?

Have you read any of this?

Do you agree with me?

🙂

Let’s talk!

~

Moving Words

“We live and breathe words.” ― Cassandra Clare, Clockwork Prince


With a heartfelt thanks to Laduchessederat,  the prompt for The Great Book of Lists for this week is written by yours truly. YES, me! ❤ ❤ ❤

And you know I am a quote junkie so you probably know what will happen next. 😀

“Words, as simple as they may seem, possess power. Once spoken, you cannot take them back. Once said, it’ll be either white or black.
 
So today, let’s make a list of those words that has pushed you forward, to do good, to be glad. Words that kept you standing. Words that encouraged you to keep moving. Words that picked you up. Words that lit you up. Words that introduced you to an unknown world. Words that explained you the meaning of life, even beyond earth.
 
Those words deserve to be shared, so let’s share them today.”

So here are THE WORDS THAT INSPIRED ME TO:

 START THIS BLOG

“There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.” ― Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

CONTINUE DREAMING

“It’s the possibility of having a dream come true that makes life interesting.” ― Paulo Coelho, The Alchemist

SHOW COMPASSION

“When you’re struggling with something, look at all the people around you and realize that every single person you see is struggling with something, and to them, it’s just as hard as what you’re going through.” ― Nicholas Sparks, Dear John

BE YOURSELF

“Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life.” ― Steve Jobs

NOT FEAR DEATH

“Death ends a life, not a relationship.” ― Mitch Albom, Tuesdays with Morrie

Photo credits: Tumblr and Quote Fancy


The Great Book of Lists by La duchesse d’Erat

Chapter 2.2 – Words that Matter

Thank you for the letting me inspire and write this week’s prompt, Laduchessederat! ❤

It is my honor. ❤

P.S.

I can include a lot more quote but I have to stop myself. ❤

I hope those words touched you, too.

🙂

~

Bound by Life by Arpita Pramanick: Book Review

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I hope it is better late than never. 🙂

Many months ago, Arpita of Scribbles@Arpita provided me a copy of her debut book titled Bound by LifeIf I remember it right, she never asked for a review, I am the one who volunteered to give her one.

I read her book for maybe a night or two, that goes to show how good it is actually. 🙂 Yet shame on me, ’cause it took me so long to post this review. (Dearest Appy, I am so sorry. ❤ I hope it is better late than never. :))

Let me now proceed to the book review for Bound by Life. 🙂

What is it about:

Bound by Life is the first book by Arpita Pramanick. It contains ten short stories.

The title story is epistolary. An old man writes a letter to his son before leaving for an old age home. Set in the backdrop of the modern nuclear family, the story contains references to the immigrant experiences of those who came to India from the then East-Pakistan (presently Bangladesh) to escape the wrath of the communal riots post-Indian independence.

One of the stories, I am Mala, has been previously published on the eFiction magazine. I am Mala is the tragic tale of a young woman who becomes the victim of the dogmatic caste system.

The protagonist of The Silent Victim, Deepa, has traumatic past. She just started college and is struggling badly with androphobia. Will she be able overcome her past and lead a normal life?

Arpita delves into the fabric of Indian life – its ethics, values, customs and superstitions. Her characters belong to different walks of life.

From tea-vendors on the pavements of Salt Lake, a leading IT hub in West Bengal (Manorama Tea Stall) to the young village boy performing in a circus in a city (The Last Show) – everyone finds a place in Bound by Life.

The stories are simple tales of day-to-day lives of the common man. It is this simplicity that adds beauty to this collection.

What I Love:

If I am to sum the ten short stories in this book, I would use the word ‘relatable’.

With the diversity of the topics Arpita has delved into, I think every reader can pick a story where he/she can relate.

On my case, the first story titled The Silent Victim appealed to me the most. Because first, I am a lady whose greatest fear is abuse. Like Deepa, I hate it when a man unknown to me gets too close to me too much but like her, I also had my share of traumatic incident once when I was in a bus.

By the way the story was told, with simple yet emotionally powerful words, Arpita was able to make me feel Deepa.

I felt the same heart-tugging effect when I read I am MalaThe story felt so true and so raw.

I love stories who stunned me, stories which I cannot predict the ending, and I am glad I experienced that with Elusive and The Girl with the White Patches

I also liked Bound by Life. It is sadly moving. While The Mother’s Plight actually reminded me of my favorite author’s, Mitch Albom’s, For One More Day.

As a mystery/crime junkie, Arpita was also able to creep me out with The Vaastu Snake.

What I Don’t Love Much: 

With all honesty, The  First Step was a bit unclear to me. I got a bit of confuse as I read the story.  The Last Show is also my least favorite. Not because it was not written well, it’s because for me it was the least relatable. While Manorama Tea Stall bored me a bit.

Lastly, I noticed a few typo and grammatical errors as I read the book. I believe the book could have been better if it was edited more. 🙂 (I am glad to know that Arpita thought of the same after I read one of her interview-post with Anand.)

Rating: 💖 💖 💖 (Good read!)

Bound by Life is available on Amazon for $2.99, and for free download with a KU subscription.

P.S.

Thanks again, Arpita. 🙂

~

 

Books with Historical Settings that I Loved

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“The past is never where you think you left it.” ― Katherine Anne Porter

The Broke and the Bookish‘s Top Ten Tuesday today is a bit hard to fill out!

February 2: Top Ten Historical Settings You Love/ Ten Historical Settings You’d Love To See or Top Futuristic Books You Love/Ten Futuristic Societies I’d Love To Read in Books

With my love-hate relationship with classic books, I can only share less than ten (or even less than five) but I will still list them! 😉

So let’s start, here are the Books with Historical Settings that I Loved!

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

The Kite Runner

Amir is the son of a wealthy Kabul merchant, a member of the ruling caste of Pashtuns. Hassan, his servant and constant companion, is a Hazara, a despised and impoverished caste. Their uncommon bond is torn by Amir’s choice to abandon his friend amidst the increasing ethnic, religious, and political tensions of the dying years of the Afghan monarchy, wrenching them far apart. But so strong is the bond between the two boys that Amir journeys back to a distant world, to try to right past wrongs against the only true friend he ever had.

The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto by Mitch Albom

The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto

Frankie, born in a burning church, abandoned as an infant, and raised by a music teacher in a small Spanish town, until war rips his life apart. At nine years old, he is sent to America in the bottom of a boat. His only possession is an old guitar and six precious strings. His amazing journey weaves him through the musical landscape of the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, with his stunning playing and singing talent affecting numerous stars (Duke Ellington, Hank Williams, Elvis Presley) until, as if predestined, he becomes a pop star himself.

He makes records. He is adored. But Frankie Presto’s gift is also his burden, as he realizes the power of the strings his teacher gave him, and how, through his music, he can actually affect people’s lives. At the height of his popularity, tortured by his biggest mistake, he vanishes. His legend grows. Only decades later, having finally healed his heart, does Frankie reappearjust before his spectacular death—to change one last life. With the Spirit of Music as our guide, we glimpse into the lives that were changed by one man whose strings could touch the music—and the magic—in each of us.

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

All the Light We Cannot See

Marie-Laure lives with her father in Paris near the Museum of Natural History, where he works as the master of its thousands of locks. When she is six, Marie-Laure goes blind and her father builds a perfect miniature of their neighborhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. When she is twelve, the Nazis occupy Paris and father and daughter flee to the walled citadel of Saint-Malo, where Marie-Laure’s reclusive great-uncle lives in a tall house by the sea. With them they carry what might be the museum’s most valuable and dangerous jewel.

In a mining town in Germany, the orphan Werner grows up with his younger sister, enchanted by a crude radio they find. Werner becomes an expert at building and fixing these crucial new instruments, a talent that wins him a place at a brutal academy for Hitler Youth, then a special assignment to track the resistance. More and more aware of the human cost of his intelligence, Werner travels through the heart of the war and, finally, into Saint-Malo, where his story and Marie-Laure’s converge.

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

The Color Purple

Taking place mostly in rural Georgia, the story focuses on the life of women of color in the southern United States in the 1930s, addressing numerous issues including their exceedingly low position in American social culture. The novel has been the frequent target of censors and appears on the American Library Association list of the 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 2000-2009 at number seventeen because of the sometimes explicit content, particularly in terms of violence.

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

The Book Thief

It’s just a small story really, about among other things: a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. . . .

Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak’s groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist–books. With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, she learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement before he is marched to Dachau.

11/22/63 by Stephen King

11/22/63

Life can turn on a dime—or stumble into the extraordinary, as it does for Jake Epping, a high school English teacher in Lisbon Falls, Maine. While grading essays by his GED students, Jake reads a gruesome, enthralling piece penned by janitor Harry Dunning: fifty years ago, Harry somehow survived his father’s sledgehammer slaughter of his entire family. Jake is blown away…but an even more bizarre secret comes to light when Jake’s friend Al, owner of the local diner, enlists Jake to take over the mission that has become his obsession—to prevent the Kennedy assassination. How? By stepping through a portal in the diner’s storeroom, and into the era of Ike and Elvis, of big American cars, sock hops, and cigarette smoke… Finding himself in warmhearted Jodie, Texas, Jake begins a new life. But all turns in the road lead to a troubled loner named Lee Harvey Oswald. The course of history is about to be rewritten…and become heart-stoppingly suspenseful.

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s third book, stands as the supreme achievement of his career. This exemplary novel of the Jazz Age has been acclaimed by generations of readers. The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when The New York Times noted “gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession,” it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s.

Manuscript Found in Accra by Paulo Coelho 

Manuscript Found in Accra

July 14, 1099. Jerusalem awaits the invasion of the crusaders who have surrounded the city’s gates. There, inside the ancient city’s walls, men and women of every age and every faith have gathered to hear the wise words of a mysterious man known only as the Copt. He has summoned the townspeople to address their fears with truth:

“Tomorrow, harmony will become discord. Joy will be replaced by grief. Peace will give way to war…. None of us can know what tomorrow will hold, because each day has its good and its bad moments. So, when you ask your questions, forget about the troops outside and the fear inside. Our task is not to leave a record of what happened on this date for those who will inherit the Earth; history will take care of that. Therefore, we will speak about our daily lives, about the difficulties we have had to face.”

Summary and photo credit: Goodreads


Have you read some of these books, too?

What are your thoughts?

🙂

~

Flying Pages

“The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.” – Dr. Seuss, I Can Read With My Eyes Shut!


It is more than a delight to fill-out Laduchessederat‘s The Great Book of Lists for this week! Well, you probably know why because it is about books! ❤ ❤ ❤

Books that made you feel like you knew the characters, like you were riding dragons or finally understanding the underlying truth of the universe, the one that made you experience the character’s journey almost like they did, the one you did not want to finish but were dying to 1/ know the end 2/ know if a sequel was already in the works.

If I can only list them all, I would surely do it! BUT, I cannot! So I will select just ten books that transported me.

They are…

1. Rising Sun by Michael Crichton

Rising Sun
Genre: Fiction, Mystery, Thriller

This book introduced me to reading and transported me to the thrilling world of crime novels. I read this for a book report when I was in high school. 🙂

2. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

The Alchemist
Genre: Inspirational, Fiction, Contemporary

This book made me a dreamer, again. I was at my life’s lowest point when I read this book and yes, it is surely a book that will move you.

3. Message in a Bottle by Nicholas Sparks

Message in a Bottle
Genre: Romance, Fiction

This book transported me to the world of grief and introduced me to romance genre and to my fave romance writer, Nicholas Sparks.

4. The Hunger Games (The Hunger Games, #1) by Suzanne Collins

The Hunger Games (The Hunger Games, #1)
Genre: YA, Dystopia

This book introduced me to YA dystopia genre and transported me to the Hunger Games arena in a fictional nation called Panem! I think I finished this series in less than a week? 😀

5. The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom

The Five People You Meet in Heaven
Genre:

This book introduced me to my most loved favorite author, Mitch Albom, and transported me to ‘heaven’. From then on, I’ve been a fan.

6. Para Kay B  by Ricky Lee

Para Kay B (o kung paano dinevastate ng pag-ibig ang 4 out of 5 sa atin)
Genre: Adult Fiction, Romance, Humor

This book introduced me to Philippine literature. It is the first local novel that I’ve read and it showed me how romance and humor work well together. 🙂

7. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

Steve Jobs
Genre: Biography, Non-fiction

This book introduced me to a well-known tech pillar, Steve Jobs. This biography transported me to the beginning of his life until his last days. It’s actually a great read. 🙂

8. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

Gone Girl
Genre: Contemporary, Thriller, Mystery

This book introduced me to the dark side of marriage and transported me to the clever yet criminal mind of Amy. It is insanely good read!

9. Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell

Eleanor & Park
Genre: YA, Romance, Contemporary

This book introduced me to one of my fave YA writers, Rainbow Rowell. Reading this innocent and imperfect high school love story transported me to my good-old-days! It actually reminded me of my first love! 😀 ❤

10. 11/22/63 by Stephen King

11/22/63
Genre: Historical Fiction, Science Fiction

It took me so long to finish this book but it is well worth the effort as this book introduced me to one of the best crime/mystery authors, Stephen King. Transporting me back to 11/22/1963, this fictional novel with a bit of magic/mystery is surely a nice way to learn American history.

Header photo credit: Dream and Pursue


The Great Book of Lists by La duchesse d’Erat

Chapter 1.4 – The Books that Transport You

Thank you for the lovely lovely prompt, Laduchessederat!

~

Books I Would Love to Receive on my Birthday

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Books make great gifts because they have whole worlds inside of them. And it’s much cheaper to buy somebody a book than it is to buy them the whole world! ― Neil Gaiman

It’s freebie week today for The Broke and the Bookish‘s Top Ten Tuesday! 😀

And because I just celebrated by birthday last Sunday, here are the books I would love to receive as gifts! 😀

1. Mitch Albom books!

I’ve read them all but I really want to have the ‘real books’. 🙂 I only have The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto and it is my gift to self last Christmas. 🙂

2. Nicholas Sparks books!

I’ve read them all, too, but I only have a copy of The Best of Me and The Rescue (birthday gifts from my dearest <3). Though I am not so in love with his latest works, I am still a fan. 🙂

3. Poetry books by Lang Leav

I am not sure if someone heed my request… but I have the sense that I’ll be receiving a book this week. 😀 (cross fingers)

4. Robert Galbraith books

I just finished Career of Evil and this series is surely one of the best mystery thriller ever! 😀 So I want to have the real books!!!

5. Rainbow Rowell books

I may not be a big fan of Carry On (I just read Fangirl and though I loved it, I am not fond of the Carry On parts so.. I won’t read it. :)).

But, I still love Rainbow Rowell and I would love to collect the ‘real’ versions of her awesome books! 😀

6. Liane Moriarty Books

I loved The Husband’s Secret and I am now reading Big Little Lies. 😀 Aside from the beautiful book covers, I do think that Liane will be my new fave author!

7. Jodi Picoult Books

I’ve only read Leaving Time and it surely is one of the best books so I guess I would love to read more Picoult novels. 🙂

8. Paulo Coelho Books

I’ve read 10 of his works and he is surely one of the most inspiring writers of our time. 🙂 So, yes, books please? 🙂

9. Graeme Simsion Books

I loved The Rosie Project a lot! 😀 And the covers are great, too! 😀

10. Kiera Cass Books

I loved the first three books! 😀 And, the covers are gorgeous! 😀

Photo credit: Credit 1, Credit 2, Credit 3, Credit 4Credit 5, Credit 6, Credit 7


What are the books you would be delighted to receive as a gift?

Share it!

Let’s talk!

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Ten Newly-Added Books in My TBR

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If you only read the books that everyone else is reading, you can only think what everyone else is thinking. – Haruki Murakami

The Broke and the Bookish‘s Top Ten Tuesday today is  Top Ten Books I’ve Recently Added To My TBR.

I’ll be quick (’cause I have a client meeting today! :D)

Treat this as my very first update for Pop Sugar’s 2016 Reading Challenge.

update

Here they are…

1. A book based on fairytale – The Crown (The Selection, #5) by Kiera Cass

The Crown (The Selection, #5)

Twenty years have passed since the events of The One, and America and Maxon’s daughter is the first princess to hold a Selection of her own. Princess Eadlyn didn’t think she would find a real partner among the Selection’s thirty-five suitors, let alone true love. But sometimes the heart has a way of surprising you…and now Eadlyn must make a choice that feels more difficult—and more important—than she ever expected.

(I am not fan of The Heir, but I will still read this book because I want to finish the entire series. :))

2. A National Book Award winner – Fortune Smiles by Adam Johnson

Fortune Smiles

In post-Katrina Louisiana, a young man and his new girlfriend search for the mother of his son. In Palo Alto, a computer programmer whose wife has a rare disease finds solace in a digital copy of the recently assassinated President. In contemporary Berlin a former Stasi agent ponders his past.

And in “”Interesting Facts”, a woman with cancer rages against the idea of her family without her.

Hugely inventive and endlessly energetic, this is a heart wrenching, surprising collection of stories that show Johnson at the top of his form.

3. A book translated to English – Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami

Norwegian Wood

Toru, a quiet and preternaturally serious young college student in Tokyo, is devoted to Naoko, a beautiful and introspective young woman, but their mutual passion is marked by the tragic death of their best friend years before.  Toru begins to adapt to campus life and the loneliness and isolation he faces there, but Naoko finds the pressures and responsibilities of life unbearable.  As she retreats further into her own world, Toru finds himself reaching out to others and drawn to a fiercely independent and sexually liberated young woman.

4. A book set in Europe – After You (Me Before You, #2) by Jojo Moyes

After You (Me Before You, #2)

After You is the sequel to the beloved New York Times million-copy bestseller, Me Before You.

5. A book that’s under 150 pages – The Possession by Annie Ernaux

The Possession

Self-regard, in the works of Annie Ernaux, is always an excruciatingly painful and exact process. Here, she revisits the peculiar kind of self-fulfillment possible when we examine ourselves in the aftermath of a love affair, and sometimes, even, through the eyes of the lost beloved.

6. A New York Times bestseller – The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah

The Nightingale

With courage, grace and powerful insight, bestselling author Kristin Hannah takes her talented pen to the epic panorama of WWII and illuminates an intimate part of history seldom seen: the women’s war. The Nightingale tells the stories of two sisters, separated by years and experience, by ideals, passion and circumstance, each embarking on her own dangerous path toward survival, love, and freedom in German-occupied, war-torn France–a heartbreakingly beautiful novel that celebrates the resilience of the human spirit and the durability of women. It is a novel for everyone, a novel for a lifetime.

7. A book that’s becoming a movie this year – The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

The Girl on the Train
Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. “Jess and Jason,” she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.

And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

8. A dystopian novel – More Than This by Patrick Ness

More Than This

A boy drowns, desperate and alone in his final moments. He dies.

Then he wakes, naked and bruised and thirsty, but alive.

How can this be? And what is this strange deserted place?

As he struggles to understand what is happening, the boy dares to hope. Might this not be the end? Might there be more to this life, or perhaps this afterlife?

( I quit reading YA dystopia last year, but now I am giving it another try. Let’s see…)

9. A book of poetry – Love & Misadventure by Lang Leav

Love & Misadventure

Beautifully illustrated and thoughtfully conceived, Love and Misadventure will take you on a rollercoaster ride through an ill-fated love affair- from the initial butterflies to the soaring heights- through to the devastating plunge. Lang Leav has an unnerving ability to see inside the hearts and minds of her readers. Her talent for translating complex emotions with astonishing simplicity has won her a cult following of devoted fans from all over the world.

(I posted on my Facebook that this is the book that I want for my birthday this week. 😀 I hope someone heard me! :D)

10. An autobiography – When A Good God Allows Rape by Joy Tan Chi – Mendoza

When A Good God Allows Rape

What Satan meant for harm, God meant for good. God’s grace transformed pain, emotional distress, and suffering into a vibrant, purposeful, and rich life. Refusing to hide behind the dark memories that wanted to hold her captive, Joy Tan-Chi Mendoza shares her story, helping her readers towards strength, encouragement, and the healing of sexual trauma and abuse.

(I got goosebumps when I heard of this courageous and inspiring story. My friend and workmate, Shie, will share me a copy and I am excited to know how will this book move me.)

That will be all!

What are the newest addition to your TBR?

Let me know! 😀

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