fireflies and crickets (a sedoka)

Little fireflies lit
the moon-void evening aching
for twinkling star’s warm loving.

Night-shift crickets sing
their choral lullaby for
all souls silently sinking.

03.26.2018
©2018 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash

In response to Blogging from A to Z Challenge and NaPoWriMo 2018.
S is for Sedoka.
Sedoka, (旋頭歌 whirling head poem) is in many ways the same verse form as the Mondo. However the Sedoka is written by 1 poet and rather than question-answer, the 2 stanzas are often parallels. This verse can be found as far back as the 6th century.
The elements of Sedoka are:
  1. 2 stanzas of 3 lines each, 19 syllables or less, often 5-7-7, sometime 5-7- 5 is used for each stanza.
  2. the stanzas should parallel each other.

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ask me not (an imayo)

Ask me not of the moments, I spent without you.
Ask me not of the kisses, I shared not with you.
Ask me not about the life, until there was you.
For I was but a lost soul, before I had you.

03.23.2018
©2018 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash

In response to Blogging from A to Z Challenge and NaPoWriMo 2018.
I is for Imayo. Imayo are:
  1. a 4 line poem.
  2. syllabic, written in 12 syllable lines broken by caesura after the 7th syllable.

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weightless (a haiku)

Autumn window smiles
as weightless leaves start falling.
Yes, you can let go.

03.23.2018
©2018 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash

In response to Blogging from A to Z Challenge and NaPoWriMo 2018.
H is for Haiku.
Haiku are:
  1. syllabic (17 syllables or less)
  2. an imagist poem (draws the emotion from the image). Concrete images are described. It is important in haiku to deemphasize the ego. The subject, not the poet is what focuses the haiku. “One of the most common characteristics of haiku,. . . . is silence.” Bruce Ross. The words silence or stillness can be used in haiku, but it is the concrete image as described that makes the reader respond to the feeling of silence.
  3. written in the moment. The past can be referred to as long as it doesn’t overpower the present.
  4. one of two forms “traditional” or “modern”
        “traditional” requires a season be named and images and emotions be drawn from of nature.
        “modern” can be images of relationship, personality, experience, etc
  5. often a tristich, commonly written in 3 lines. BUT, it can be written in 1 or 2 lines. (if not broken into 3 lines, the haiku should still follow the pattern of 3 units, 2 images that either conflict or expand resulting in insight.) The common break down of syllables:
    • L1 5 syllables describes image (traditional name season)
    • L2 7 syllables, adds conflicting image or expands first image
    • L3 5 syllables provide insight (the ah ha! moment) through a juxtaposed image.

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