Nixie

On her deathbed, my beloved grandma handed me the letter which she has kept since it was returned by the postman three months ago. I can recall that day because that’s the last day I saw her lively.

Old postman, as old as her, apologized for keeping the almost faded tattered letter. According to him, war has prohibited sending one, thus the very long delay, and he is too ashamed to return it to her, causing longer delay.

With tears brimming, grandma told me to look for the man who have been waiting for this letter for decades now.

Her weak hands wrote the time-erased address seconds before she went breathless— which signalled her life’s ending and the beginning of my journey of knowing if love is really enduring.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer

Photo credit: Unsplash, Tumblr

Word prompt: Melinda Kucsera of In Media Res (Thank you, dearest friend!)

 

Brontide

It took me so many years to find a mountain-home away from the seashore that holds our precious memories. It took me great effort and a sum of money to build this fortress that will protect me from your silent yet screaming ghost.

But when I encountered my first storm and I heard the whispers of the far-flung thunder, I figured I was wrong. Each brontide was stamped with the sweet sound of your sighs. Each grumble was sealed your voice’s hypnotizing sweet cries.

So my dear, please answer, where can I hide from you now?

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer

Photo credit: Unsplash, Tumblr

Word prompt: Melinda Kucsera of In Media Res (Thank you, dearest friend!)

Word-High July: Amihan

21

Amihan

The whistling wind
is like a ghost
that creeps inside
my hollow holes
dug by
your sudden absence.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer

Photo credit: BuzzFeed, Unsplash


In response to Word-High July: 30 Beautiful Filipino Words: Day 21 – Amihan.

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Aurora

15

Aurora: An Aubade*

Colors changing
from dark to light,
sun and moon shifting
from dull to bright,
stars disappearing
goodbye black night,
I lie awake waiting
for you to comeback.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

Word Inspiration: Sarah Doughty of Heartstring Eulogies (Thank you, Sarah!)


*Aubade

Alba or Aubade (dawn song) is a love poem, specifically the parting of lovers at dawn. Conflict between love and responsibility is at the center of this poetic genre.

This genre dates back to 12th century France and is the counterpart to a secular Evensong, Serena or Serenade.. The name Alba comes from the medieval watchman’s cry “alba” announcing the passing of the night and return of day. The early Occitan troubadourpoems ended each stanza with the word.

The Alba or Aubade is:

  • a love poem, most often mourning the parting of lovers while extolling the coming day.
  • constructed at the discretion of the poet, length, stanzaic form, meter and or rhyme. although often a smattering of rhyme is present without any particular rhyme scheme.
  • dramatic since it is often dialogue between the parting lovers or coming from a cuckold husband or a watchman’ warning. Sometimes dialogue is silent, expressed in images.

 

Word-High July: Bughaw

6

Bughaw

I’ve been eaten up
by the expansive sea
and endless sky,
since you’ve been gone.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer

Photo credit: BuzzFeed, Unsplash


In response to Word-High July: 30 Beautiful Filipino Words: Day 6 – Bughaw.

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Nowhere

I thought
you are
my heart’s compass
yet
you did
nothing
but lead me
n
o
w
h
e
r
e.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Deviantart


In response to Mindlovemisery MenageriePhoto Challenge #116

MLM 1

Read more awesome poems here:

Our Ocean

Our Ocean: An Onda Mel*

Salted wind in swollen seashore,
whispering shells,
singing bird’s bells,
seeping fine sand in my feet’s pores.
You came rushing, warned of a storm,
and then it came,
and end our lane,
wrecking our ocean, all it’s form.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to May Book Prompts –  by Sarah Doughty and MahWrites.

Today’s prompt is The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman.

The Ocean at the End of the Lane

The Onda Mel* is an invented verse form introduced by Renelda Gibson.

The Onda Mel is:

  • an octastich, a poem in 8 lines made up of 2 quatrains.
  • syllabic, 8-4-4-8-8-4-4-8 syllables per line.
  • rhymed abbacddc.