Eternal: An Endecha

Sun’s love for moon’s eternal.
They may not shine together
but they still share the same sky.
I hope we’re like them, but we’ll ne’er be, ever.

Photo credit: Unsplash

In response to OctPoWriMo 2016 by Morgan Dragonwillow‘s Day 31.

The Endecha is a ” The Canción triste que encierra un lamento”, (“sad song that locks up a moan”), a 16th century Spanish dirge or song of sorrow.

The Endecha is

  • stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains.
  • syllabic, written with 7-7-7-11 syllables per line.
  • rhymed, rhyme scheme xaxa xbxb etc., x being unrhymed. The rhyme is often consonance only but true rhyme may be used.

Abandonment: An Aubade

Smiling sun always arrive
with the hope of a better life.

Maybe we are the only exception.
The poor ones inside a rich legion.

Dark nights are definitely ours,
but mornings restart our hearts’ wars.

Once the sun rays start to shine,
they remind me you are not mine.

Photo credit: Unsplash

In response to OctPoWriMo 2016 by Morgan Dragonwillow‘s Day 26.

Aubade (dawn song) is a love poem, specifically the parting of lovers at dawn. Conflict between love and responsibility is at the center of this poetic genre.

This genre dates back to 12th century France and is the counterpart to a secular Evensong, Serena or Serenade.. The name Alba comes from the medieval watchman’s cry “alba” announcing the passing of the night and return of day. The early Occitan troubadour poems ended each stanza with the word.

The Alba or Aubade is:

  • a love poem, most often mourning the parting of lovers while extolling the coming day.
  • constructed at the discretion of the poet, length, stanzaic form, meter and or rhyme. although often a smattering of rhyme is present without any particular rhyme scheme.
  • dramatic since it is often dialogue between the parting lovers or coming from a cuckold husband or a watchman’ warning. Sometimes dialogue is silent, expressed in images.

Dangerous: A Deten

You have
dangerous eyes.
They trapped me willingly,
like a lunatic lost in love
and lies.

Close it
so I’ll see light.
I don’t need rescuing,
my mind can regain its own wit
and fight.

Alone
I will be fine.
Like a new butterfly flying
I’ll flourish, exist on my own,
all mine.

Photo credit: Unsplash

In response to OctPoWriMo 2016 by Morgan Dragonwillow‘s Day 22.

The Deten has a unique rhyme scheme. It was created by Johnn Schroeder and can be found at Poetry Base.

The Deten is:

  • a 15 line poem made up of 3 cinquains.
  • meter at the discretion of the poet. Iambic pentameter is suggested, but tetrameter or sprung rhythm would also work. It might interesting to use the Crapsey Cinquain syllabic frame 2-4-6-8-2.
  • rhymed abcab decde fgcfg.

In-depth: An Imayo

Autopsy my tender words, ‘fore you let them in.
They may sound sugary sweet, but better check ‘em.
In-depth they bleed dark curses— chocolate-coated.
Just like your false promises, bland and not buttered.

Photo credit: Unsplash

In response to OctPoWriMo 2016 by Morgan Dragonwillow‘s Day 16.

Imayo It seems that whenever I research a Japanese form, it involves an alternating 5-7 or 7-5 syllabic structure. The Imayo (present style) of the 12th century is no exception. This form creates long lines broken by caesura separating 7 and 5 syllables in the line.

The Imayo is associated with song, (recitation in a high pitch) and originated with the common people in folk song. But by the Heian period it was embraced by the Imperial court. This folk art evolved with the influence of Imperial aristocrats and famous courtesans or Shirabyoshi dancers incorporated the Imayo into their performances. One type of Imayo is used in Kabuki, Japanese theatre.

The Imayo is:

  • a 4 line poem.
  • syllabic, written in 12 syllable lines broken by caesura after the 7th syllable.

The Bridesmaid’s Secret

Caressing  pure, pristine petals as she swings up and down.
Later these will be showered to her best friend wearing her dream white wedding gown.
None knows she carries the first child, the grinning groom wants to hide.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo credit: Ben Rosett 

In response to Sonya of Only 100 Words‘ Three Line Tales Week Thirty-Seven.

If you want to join, here are the simple rules:

  • Write three lines inspired by the photo prompt.
  • Link back to this post.
  • Tag your post with 3LineTales (so we can find you in the Reader).
  • Read and comment on other TLT participants’ lines.
  • Have fun.

Pick One

Carefully choosing among the sharp, the hard, the brute and the bad,
my shaking hand grazes the powerful tools’ varied edges
as it discerns what it’ll use to you and your mistress.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Ashim D’Silva


In response to Sonya of Only 100 Words‘ Three Line Tales Week Twenty-Eight.

If you want to join, here are the simple rules:

  • Write three lines inspired by the photo prompt.
  • Link back to this post.
  • Tag your post with 3LineTales (so we can find you in the Reader).
  • Read and comment on other TLT participants’ lines.
  • Have fun.