P e d e s t r i a n ( A Tanka )

Is it to the right,
or is it to the near left?
Should I cross the bridge
or should I retreat before
the inevitable fall?

02.16.2018
©2018 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash

In response to dVerse MTB — Brevity
dverse

Tick Tock: A Tanka

t

Tick Tock: A Tanka
©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer


long when you’re waiting
short when you’re doing something
slow when earth’s freezing
fast when summer sun’s rising
time’s bending, warping.

Photo credit: Cliff Johnson


In response to Blogging from A to Z Challenge: T is for Tanka.

Tanka

Tanka, 短歌 “short song” is meant to be filled with personal and emotional expression. The tanka expresses feelings and thoughts regardless of the direction they take. Originally there was also an attempt to connect these thoughts and feelings to nature. The tanka, unlike the haiku, may use figurative expressions such as metaphor or simile. The form is less rigid, more casual than the haiku. It allows the imagination to help the poet express feelings.

The tanka is:

  • syllabic, 31 or less syllables, most commonly 5-7-5-7-7, in variation the lines are best kept with odd numbered syllables.
  • normally but not always a 5 line poem, the 5 line pattern however does seem to prevail.
  • defined by content and style more than the syllabic prescription. But there is still a pattern of short and long lines rather than a metered equal length.
  • written as a personal or emotional expression of themes such as natural beauty, love, the impermanence of live, the activities of the common people
  • composed with the priority of “to be touched by things” “mono no aware” and use of concrete images.

Missed a letter/poem? Read all Poetry from A-Z here.

Heart’s Birth: A Haibun*

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Fierce wind drops, noisy wind blows, flood water inside our house flows. My clumsy-self tries so hard to tie my only pair of shoe, I have to go to school, it’s my sole due. School’s our only hope, that’s our home’s breath. Family’s in falling slope, quitting school means death.

courageous heart was
born with home’s tough winter’s breath
dream on, mom ‘ways said.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Data


In response to Daily Post: Breath and Napowrimo Day 18.

 

Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that incorporates “the sound of home.” Think back to your childhood, and the figures of speech and particular ways of talking that the people around you used, and which you may not hear anymore.

*Haibun

Haibun is a joining of prose and haiku. Originating in Japan, found as far back as the 10th century and made popular by Basho in the 17th century, it is autobiographic often taking the form of a travelogue. Modern haibun usually draws its inspiration from everyday events. The form usually opens with prose which is short narrative. It sets the scene or describes a specific moment in objective detail. The haiku that follows relates to the core of the prose bringing emotional insight through an intensified image. There can be one or more prose-haiku combinations.

  • The prose describes in depth a scene or moment in a detached manner. It should be brief, concise and poetic. It is written in present tense and does not give away the moment of insight that should be revealed in the haiku that follows.
  • The haiku should not be in direct relationship with the prose but bring a different slant to the images to heighten the emotion drawn from the defining moment of the prose revealed in the haiku. It should not repeat words or phrases from the prose.

BOOK READS: A Review and Personal History of ‘Rising Sun’ by Michael Crichton

Genre: Crime Thriller Published: January 27, 1992
Genre: Crime Thriller
Published: January 27, 1992

It has been six years since I have read, for the very first time, a full length novel. This happened not because I would like to do it, this happened because it is compulsory. I was in fourth year high school during that time. My English teacher, Mrs. Emilia Rivera, required each of her students to do a book report. No book report, no grade. In short, we have no choice. 

I was the English Club President back then and as our club adviser, Mam Rivera and I has kindled a bit close teacher-student relationship. (I ‘idolized’ her a lot and the fact that she took up Journalism is partly a reason why I also took up the same course.) Thus, I am a bit pressured to do best in her final straw of activities.

My classmates, eager to finish their reports as well, hurriedly went book hunting in nearby bookstores. While they scout for a book, I look for someone whom I can borrow one. (Money’s an issue back then.. Maybe still a bit until now.) Thankfully, my childhood friend and church-mate Lilet lend me a novel written by her favorite author which is Michael Crichton and it was the Rising Sun.

To tell you honestly, I cannot recall the exact details of the book. Hey, it has been more than six years already! But I remember vividly that the victim died because of sexual asphyxia. I also can recall that this novel, a murder mystery, is about how the Americans and Japanese fought for supremacy in the business world.

For a first time novel reader, Rising Sun is for me a pleasant introduction to the world of written words. With 399 pages, I cannot recall if I got bored. It is because Michael Crichton managed to write each page and chapters with a certain urgency that makes you read, read and read until it ends. Actually, this is the only book, as of now, that I have read thrice.

With a number of Crichton books on my virtual bookshelf and with numerous crime, murder and mystery books that is on my read list, Rising Sun has clearly made me fall in love with reading novels. Reading it, although at first is done unwillingly, appeared to be a decision that I would never regret.

THE ‘WRAP’: A Japanese business executive, later on, appeared to be the crime perpetrator. He then committed suicide.

PICKED WISE WORDS: The Japanese think strategically . . . Business is like warfare to them.

THE VERDICT: Highly recommended.