2016 Reading Challenge Update: February Part 1

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With the help of Chinese New Year holiday, I started my month-long reading at full speed! 😀 😀 😀

Here are the six (yes, six!) beautiful novels that I have read since February 1 ! ❤

7th – A book translated to English – Norwegian Wood by by Haruki Murakami

Norwegian Wood

What is it about: Toru, a quiet and preternaturally serious young college student in Tokyo, is devoted to Naoko, a beautiful and introspective young woman, but their mutual passion is marked by the tragic death of their best friend years before.  Toru begins to adapt to campus life and the loneliness and isolation he faces there, but Naoko finds the pressures and responsibilities of life unbearable.  As she retreats further into her own world, Toru finds himself reaching out to others and drawn to a fiercely independent and sexually liberated young woman.

What I Love: Subtly sexual, poignantly moving, a bit saddening.

What I Don’t Love Much: The end was a bit predictable.

Wise Words: 

“Death exists not as the opposite but as part of life.”

“If you only read the books that everyone else is readin, you can only think what everyone else is thinking.”

“By living our lives, we nurture death.”

“No truth can cure the sadness we feel from losing a loved one. No truth, no sincerity, no strength, no kindness, can cure that sorrow.

Rating: 💖 💖 💖  (Good read!)

8th – A book set in your home state – Ang mga Kaibigan ni Mama Susan by Bob Ong

Ang mga Kaibigan ni Mama Susan

What is it about: A haunting story about religion and broken homes. Bob Ong, a Filipino writer, told an eclectic story through a journal of a teenage boy.

What I Love: I love a book that can give me goosies, and this one surely did it!

What I Don’t Love Much: I am not a fan of the format. And maybe I expected too much because Bob Ong is a well-acclaimed novelist here in the Philippines.

Rating: 💖 💖 💖  (Good read!)

9th – A book of poetry – Love & Misadventures by Lang Leav

Love & Misadventure

What is it about: Beautifully illustrated and thoughtfully conceived, Love and Misadventure will take you on a rollercoaster ride through an ill-fated love affair- from the initial butterflies to the soaring heights- through to the devastating plunge. Lang Leav has an unnerving ability to see inside the hearts and minds of her readers. Her talent for translating complex emotions with astonishing simplicity has won her a cult following of devoted fans from all over the world.

What I Love: EVERYTHING! Everything about this book is GREAT! The illustrations, the poem, the flash fictions. *smiling sigh*

What I Don’t Love Much: NOTHING!

Beautiful Words: The whole book is actually a collection of beautiful wise words. I could put them all here! 😀 But my favorite is this one:

Rating: 💖 💖 💖 💖 💖 (GREAT READ!)

10th – A book that’s guaranteed to bring you joy – One Plus One by Jojo Moyes

The One Plus One
What is it about: With two jobs and two children, Jess Thomas does her best day after day. But it’s hard on your own. And sometimes you take risks you shouldn’t. Because you have to . . .

Jess’s gifted, quirky daughter Tanzie is brilliant with numbers, but without a helping hand she’ll never get the chance to shine. And Nicky, Jess’s teenage stepson, can’t fight the bullies alone.

Sometimes Jess feels like they’re sinking . . .

Into their lives comes Ed Nicholls, a man whose life is in chaos, and who is running from a deeply uncertain future. But he has time on his hands. He knows what it’s like to be lonely. And he wants to help…

What I Love: It made me smile, chuckle and almost laugh, and it also made me cry, and almost weep.

Tinge with life’s complexities and miseries like bullying and a lying husband, Jojo Moyes have written such a beautiful book that is raw in emotion.

What I Don’t Love Much: Actually, nothing. This book is great. But it will not get five hearts because Me Before You is still better. 🙂

Wise Words:

“The choices you make now will determine the rest of your life.”

“Because even if the whole world was throwing rocks at you, if you still had your mother or father at your back, you’d be okay.”

“When you work hard to get somewhere, it’s quite nice to show people where you belong.”

Rating: 💖 💖 💖  💖 (Good read, definitely!)

11th – A book that is published in 2016 – Never Never: Part Three(Never Never, #3) by Colleen Hoover and Tarryn Fisher

Never Never: Part Three (Never Never, #3)

What is it about: Together, Silas Nash and Charlize Wynwood must look deeper into the past to find out who they were and who they want to be. With time ticking down, the couple are in a race to find the answers they need before they lose everything. Can they regain what they once had? And will it restore who they once were?

What I Love: The romantic toe-curler lines. Yes, they brought back the high school in me! 😀

What I Don’t Love Much: My Goodreads review is…

Impressed,

that was me after Never, Never Part 1.

A bit impressed, a bit confused,
that was me after I read Never, Never Part 2.

Not impressed, so confused,
that was me after I read Never Never Part 3.

That was it?
Really?
That was it?
*sigh*

so there…

Cheesy Words: 

“Texts get deleted and conversations fade, but I swear I’ll have every single letter you’ve written for me  until the day I die.”

Rating: 💖 💖 (Good yet a bit disappointing.)

12th – A sequel – Lullabies by Lang Leav

Lullabies

What is it about:  A sequel to the hugely popular, best-selling Love & Misadventure, Lullabies continues to explore the intricacies of love and loss.

Set to a musical theme, love’s poetic journey in this new, original collection begins with a Duet and travels through Interlude and Finale with an Encore popular piece from the best-selling Love & Misadventure. Lang Leav’s evocative poetry speaks to the soul of anyone who is on this journey.

What I Love: EVERYTHING! Yes! 😀 This might be more painful but this is still awesome. The poems, the ironies, the stories do tug the heartstrings!

What I Don’t Love Much: NOTHING!

Beautiful Words: Among the many gorgeous poems and lines, this is my favorite. ❤

Rating: 💖 💖 💖 💖 💖 (GREAT READ!)

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Pop Sugar and Goodreads

Story Summary: Goodreads

Ten Valentine Reads (with *kilig* excerpts)

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“There is no mistaking a real book when one meets it. It is like falling in love…” ― Christopher Morley

Today is The Broke and the Bookish‘ Valentine’s-inspired Top Ten Tuesday! Funnily, though, I published my own Top 10 Novels to Read on Valentine’s last year (plus Top 10 movies!).

So… for a change… I will be sharing with you my ten recent reads perfect for the love season plus words from each book that made me grin and of course made me *kilig*! ❤

FYI: 

kilig (A Filipino word with no direct English translation).
1. noun. It is the sudden feeling of an inexplicable joy one gets when something romantic or idealistic occurs.

When kilig, one may experience the following:

*butterflies in one’s stomach
*heart melting
*shivers down one’s spine
*irrepressible noises from one’s mouth
*uncontrollable smiling
*an inner conflict between hope of something wished for and reality

Here are the Ten Valentine Reads with some heartfelt excerpts! ❤

Love & Misadventure
First Love
Before I fell
in love with words, 
with setting skies
and singing birds-
it was you I fell
in love with first.
Norwegian Wood
“Letters are just pieces of paper,” I said. “Burn them, and what stays in your heart will stay; keep them, and what vanishes will vanish.”
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda
“…Why would I want to watch other people kissing,” I say, “when I could be kissing you?”
Fangirl
“I miss you.”
“That’s stupid,” she said. “I saw you this morning.”
“It’s not the time,” Levi said, and she could hear that he was smiling.” It’s the distance.”
All the Bright Places
“You have been in every way all that anyone could be.… If anybody could have saved me it would have been you.”
See Me
In the end, the only one you can ever really please is yourself. How others feel is up to them.
Everything, Everything
In my head I know I’ve been in love before, but it doesn’t feel like it. Being in love with you is better than the first time. It feels like the first time and the last time and the only time all at once.
Every Day (Every Day, #1)
The moment you fall in love feels like it has centuries behind it, generations – all of them rearranging themselves so this precise, remarkable intersection could happen. In your heart, in your bones, no matter how silly you know it is, you feel that everything has been leading to this, all the secret arrows were pointing here, the universe and time itself crafted this long ago, and you are just now realizing it, you are just now arriving at the place you were always meant to be.
Stargirl (Stargirl, #1)
“You liked me.”
I smiled.
“You were smitten with me. You were speechless to behold my beauty. You had never met anyone so fascinating. You thought of me every waking minute. You dreamed about me. You couldn’t stand it. You couldn’t let such wonderfulness out of your sight. You had to follow me.”
I turned to Cinnamon. He licked my nose. “Don’t give yourself so much credit. It was your rat I was after.”
She laughed, and the desert sang.”
We Were Liars
“He was contemplation and enthusiasm. Ambition and strong coffee. I could have looked at him forever.”

Words and photo credit: Goodreads


What are you reading this love month?

Have your read some of these?

Let’s talk!

🙂

~

Ten Newly-Added Books in My TBR

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If you only read the books that everyone else is reading, you can only think what everyone else is thinking. – Haruki Murakami

The Broke and the Bookish‘s Top Ten Tuesday today is  Top Ten Books I’ve Recently Added To My TBR.

I’ll be quick (’cause I have a client meeting today! :D)

Treat this as my very first update for Pop Sugar’s 2016 Reading Challenge.

update

Here they are…

1. A book based on fairytale – The Crown (The Selection, #5) by Kiera Cass

The Crown (The Selection, #5)

Twenty years have passed since the events of The One, and America and Maxon’s daughter is the first princess to hold a Selection of her own. Princess Eadlyn didn’t think she would find a real partner among the Selection’s thirty-five suitors, let alone true love. But sometimes the heart has a way of surprising you…and now Eadlyn must make a choice that feels more difficult—and more important—than she ever expected.

(I am not fan of The Heir, but I will still read this book because I want to finish the entire series. :))

2. A National Book Award winner – Fortune Smiles by Adam Johnson

Fortune Smiles

In post-Katrina Louisiana, a young man and his new girlfriend search for the mother of his son. In Palo Alto, a computer programmer whose wife has a rare disease finds solace in a digital copy of the recently assassinated President. In contemporary Berlin a former Stasi agent ponders his past.

And in “”Interesting Facts”, a woman with cancer rages against the idea of her family without her.

Hugely inventive and endlessly energetic, this is a heart wrenching, surprising collection of stories that show Johnson at the top of his form.

3. A book translated to English – Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami

Norwegian Wood

Toru, a quiet and preternaturally serious young college student in Tokyo, is devoted to Naoko, a beautiful and introspective young woman, but their mutual passion is marked by the tragic death of their best friend years before.  Toru begins to adapt to campus life and the loneliness and isolation he faces there, but Naoko finds the pressures and responsibilities of life unbearable.  As she retreats further into her own world, Toru finds himself reaching out to others and drawn to a fiercely independent and sexually liberated young woman.

4. A book set in Europe – After You (Me Before You, #2) by Jojo Moyes

After You (Me Before You, #2)

After You is the sequel to the beloved New York Times million-copy bestseller, Me Before You.

5. A book that’s under 150 pages – The Possession by Annie Ernaux

The Possession

Self-regard, in the works of Annie Ernaux, is always an excruciatingly painful and exact process. Here, she revisits the peculiar kind of self-fulfillment possible when we examine ourselves in the aftermath of a love affair, and sometimes, even, through the eyes of the lost beloved.

6. A New York Times bestseller – The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah

The Nightingale

With courage, grace and powerful insight, bestselling author Kristin Hannah takes her talented pen to the epic panorama of WWII and illuminates an intimate part of history seldom seen: the women’s war. The Nightingale tells the stories of two sisters, separated by years and experience, by ideals, passion and circumstance, each embarking on her own dangerous path toward survival, love, and freedom in German-occupied, war-torn France–a heartbreakingly beautiful novel that celebrates the resilience of the human spirit and the durability of women. It is a novel for everyone, a novel for a lifetime.

7. A book that’s becoming a movie this year – The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

The Girl on the Train
Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. “Jess and Jason,” she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.

And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

8. A dystopian novel – More Than This by Patrick Ness

More Than This

A boy drowns, desperate and alone in his final moments. He dies.

Then he wakes, naked and bruised and thirsty, but alive.

How can this be? And what is this strange deserted place?

As he struggles to understand what is happening, the boy dares to hope. Might this not be the end? Might there be more to this life, or perhaps this afterlife?

( I quit reading YA dystopia last year, but now I am giving it another try. Let’s see…)

9. A book of poetry – Love & Misadventure by Lang Leav

Love & Misadventure

Beautifully illustrated and thoughtfully conceived, Love and Misadventure will take you on a rollercoaster ride through an ill-fated love affair- from the initial butterflies to the soaring heights- through to the devastating plunge. Lang Leav has an unnerving ability to see inside the hearts and minds of her readers. Her talent for translating complex emotions with astonishing simplicity has won her a cult following of devoted fans from all over the world.

(I posted on my Facebook that this is the book that I want for my birthday this week. 😀 I hope someone heard me! :D)

10. An autobiography – When A Good God Allows Rape by Joy Tan Chi – Mendoza

When A Good God Allows Rape

What Satan meant for harm, God meant for good. God’s grace transformed pain, emotional distress, and suffering into a vibrant, purposeful, and rich life. Refusing to hide behind the dark memories that wanted to hold her captive, Joy Tan-Chi Mendoza shares her story, helping her readers towards strength, encouragement, and the healing of sexual trauma and abuse.

(I got goosebumps when I heard of this courageous and inspiring story. My friend and workmate, Shie, will share me a copy and I am excited to know how will this book move me.)

That will be all!

What are the newest addition to your TBR?

Let me know! 😀

~

Top Ten Books I Missed Reading last 2015

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“A mind needs books as a sword needs a whetstone, if it is to keep its edge.” ― George R.R. Martin, A Game of Thrones

The Broke and the Bookish‘s Top Ten Tuesday is Top Ten 2015 Releases I Meant To Get To But Didn’t.

But I am tweaking it! 😀

Here’s the ten books I would want to read last year, but wasn’t able to do so! 

P.S. The first three books were my first reads for 2015! 😀

1. We Are Called to Rise: A Novel by Laura McBride

We Are Called to Rise

An immigrant boy whose family is struggling to assimilate. A middle-aged housewife coping with an imploding marriage and a troubled son. A social worker at home in the darker corners of Las Vegas. A wounded soldier recovering from an injury he can’t remember getting. By the time we realize how these voices will connect, the impossible and perhaps the unbearable has already happened. 

2. Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

Fangirl

Cath is a Simon Snow fan.

Okay, the whole world is a Simon Snow fan…

But for Cath, being a fan is her life—and she’s really good at it. She and her twin sister, Wren, ensconced themselves in the Simon Snow series when they were just kids; it’s what got them through their mother leaving.

Reading. Rereading. Hanging out in Simon Snow forums, writing Simon Snow fan fiction, dressing up like the characters for every movie premiere.

Cath’s sister has mostly grown away from fandom, but Cath can’t let go. She doesn’t want to.

3. All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

All the Bright Places

Theodore Finch is fascinated by death, and he constantly thinks of ways he might kill himself. But each time, something good, no matter how small, stops him.

Violet Markey lives for the future, counting the days until graduation, when she can escape her Indiana town and her aching grief in the wake of her sister’s recent death.

When Finch and Violet meet on the ledge of the bell tower at school, it’s unclear who saves whom. And when they pair up on a project to discover the “natural wonders” of their state, both Finch and Violet make more important discoveries: It’s only with Violet that Finch can be himself—a weird, funny, live-out-loud guy who’s not such a freak after all. And it’s only with Finch that Violet can forget to count away the days and start living them. But as Violet’s world grows, Finch’s begins to shrink.

4. Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli

Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda

Sixteen-year-old and not-so-openly gay Simon Spier prefers to save his drama for the school musical. But when an email falls into the wrong hands, his secret is at risk of being thrust into the spotlight. Now Simon is actually being blackmailed: if he doesn’t play wingman for class clown Martin, his sexual identity will become everyone’s business. Worse, the privacy of Blue, the pen name of the boy he’s been emailing, will be compromised.

With some messy dynamics emerging in his once tight-knit group of friends, and his email correspondence with Blue growing more flirtatious every day, Simon’s junior year has suddenly gotten all kinds of complicated. Now, change-averse Simon has to find a way to step out of his comfort zone before he’s pushed out—without alienating his friends, compromising himself, or fumbling a shot at happiness with the most confusing, adorable guy he’s never met.

5. Career of Evil (Cormoran Strike, #3) by Robert Galbraith (Pseudonym), J.K. Rowling

Career of Evil (Cormoran Strike, #3)

When a mysterious package is delivered to Robin Ellacott, she is horrified to discover that it contains a woman’s severed leg.

Her boss, private detective Cormoran Strike, is less surprised but no less alarmed. There are four people from his past who he thinks could be responsible – and Strike knows that any one of them is capable of sustained and unspeakable brutality.

With the police focusing on the one suspect Strike is increasingly sure is not the perpetrator, he and Robin take matters into their own hands, and delve into the dark and twisted worlds of the other three men. But as more horrendous acts occur, time is running out for the two of them…

6. Me and Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl

Greg Gaines is the last master of high school espionage, able to disappear at will into any social environment. He has only one friend, Earl, and together they spend their time making movies, their own incomprehensible versions of Coppola and Herzog cult classics.

Until Greg’s mother forces him to rekindle his childhood friendship with Rachel.

Rachel has been diagnosed with leukemia—-cue extreme adolescent awkwardness—-but a parental mandate has been issued and must be obeyed. When Rachel stops treatment, Greg and Earl decide the thing to do is to make a film for her, which turns into the Worst Film Ever Made and becomes a turning point in each of their lives.

7. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird

Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, To Kill A Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior—to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos. Now with over 18 million copies in print and translated into forty languages, this regional story by a young Alabama woman claims universal appeal. Harper Lee always considered her book to be a simple love story. Today it is regarded as a masterpiece of American literature.

8. South of the Border, West of the Sun by Haruki Murakami

South of the Border, West of the Sun

Born in 1951 in an affluent Tokyo suburb, Hajime – beginning in Japanese – has arrived at middle age wanting for almost nothing. The postwar years have brought him a fine marriage, two daughters, and an enviable career as the proprietor of two jazz clubs. Yet a nagging sense of inauthenticity about his success threatens Hajime’s happiness. And a boyhood memory of a wise, lonely girl named Shimamoto clouds his heart.

9. P.S. I Love You by Cecelia Ahern

P.S. I Love You

Holly couldn’t live without her husband Gerry, until the day she had to. They were the kind of young couple who could finish each other’s sentences. When Gerry succumbs to a terminal illness and dies, 30-year-old Holly is set adrift, unable to pick up the pieces. But with the help of a series of letters her husband left her before he died and a little nudging from an eccentric assortment of family and friends, she learns to laugh, overcome her fears, and discover a world she never knew existed.

10. Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty

Big Little Lies

Madeline is a force to be reckoned with. She’s funny and biting, passionate, she remembers everything and forgives no one. Her ex-husband and his yogi new wife have moved into her beloved beachside community, and their daughter is in the same kindergarten class as Madeline’s youngest (how is this possible?). And to top it all off, Madeline’s teenage daughter seems to be choosing Madeline’s ex-husband over her. (How. Is. This. Possible?).

Celeste is the kind of beautiful woman who makes the world stop and stare. While she may seem a bit flustered at times, who wouldn’t be, with those rambunctious twin boys? Now that the boys are starting school, Celeste and her husband look set to become the king and queen of the school parent body. But royalty often comes at a price, and Celeste is grappling with how much more she is willing to pay.

New to town, single mom Jane is so young that another mother mistakes her for the nanny. Jane is sad beyond her years and harbors secret doubts about her son. But why? While Madeline and Celeste soon take Jane under their wing, none of them realizes how the arrival of Jane and her inscrutable little boy will affect them all.

I believe they are not all 2015 releases?

Nonetheless, I will be reading all these books this year!

How about you?

What are the books that you missed reading last year?

Share it to me!

~

Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Books On My Fall TBR

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A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. – George R.R. Martin

I can’t help but smile as I write this post because The Broke and the Bookish’s Top Ten Tuesday today is almost related to my post last week, Top Ten Books I am Dying to Read.

September 22: Top Ten Books On My Fall TBR

But instead of repeating those books, I will feature the 10 books that I ought to finish this fall. They are all part of PopSugar’s Reading Challenge 2015 that I would like to wrap up, soon!

Here they are:

1. A book you own but have never read – Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon

Everything, Everything

2. A nonfiction book – You Can You Will: 8 Undeniable Qualities of a Winner by Joel Osteen

You Can You Will: 8 Undeniable Qualities of a Winner

3. A classic romance – Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez

Love in the Time of Cholera

4. A Pulitzer Prize-winning book – The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

The Goldfinch

5. A book based on a true story – Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert

Eat, Pray, Love

6. A book at the bottom of your to-read list – To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird

7. A book more than 100 years old – Alice in Wonderland (Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, #1) by Lewis Carroll 

Alice in Wonderland (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, #1)

8. A book you were supposed to read in school but didn’t – All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

All the Light We Cannot See9. A book with antonyms in the title – South of the Border, West of the Sun by Haruki Murakami

South of the Border, West of the Sun

10. A book that came out the year you were born – The Pelican Brief by John Grisham
The Pelican Brief

What are you reading this fall?
Do you have a reading challenge, too?
I’m excited to hear it from you!
🙂
~

2015 Reading Challenge Update: A BOOK ORIGINALLY WRITTEN IN A DIFFERENT LANGUAGE (11/50)

Picture2 It has been a while since I posted an update for my 2015 challenge. Forgive me guys. I have been very busy this past few weeks.Though I have been busy, I was still able to sneak some book reads so here is my latest update.

As of now, I am done reading 12 books and according to my Goodreads account, I am two books ahead of schedule! Yikes! Moving on, for A BOOK ORIGINALLY WRITTEN IN A DIFFERENT LANGUAGE, I read Haruki Murakami‘s Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage.

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Genre: Bildungsroman Published: April 2013
Judging from the name of the author himself, it is clear that this books is originally written in Nihonggo, the Japanese language as Haruki Murakami is  a Kyoto-based popular contemporary Japanese writer and translator.
BOOK THOUGHTS: 
As I find it hard to get enough time to do my reviews, I’ll have book thoughts alongside my reading challenge updates. Please consider this a short book review. 🙂
Haruki Murakami’s work is described as ‘easily accessible, yet profoundly complex’. I found this book as the exact epitome of this description.
My Rating: 💖💖💖
The Story:
Technically, the premise of the book is basic. Tzukuri Tazaki, the novel’s main man, had a group of friends in highschool. All of his friends, two girls and two boys, have names or surnames that means a color, which are red, blue, white and black.
Murakami started the book with Tzukuri describing each of his friends colorful and strong personalities.  admitted that among his peers, his name and his personality is the most dull, thus, colorless.
Amid his insecurities, he shared good relationship with his group of friends until they suddenly dropped him out of the group. This left him shattered.
As Tzukuri aged and fulfill his own dream, he decided to mend his broken past to be able to have the future that he wanted for himself.
The Blurb:
Like how most of his readers and critics described his work, Haruki Murakami’s Colorless Tzukuri Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage is easy to understand yet it has the right amount of depth.
As he alternately tell the story of Tzukuri’s past and present, Murakami was able to paint the picture of the book vividly. His ability to connect the unattached stories is just commendable.
The story is thought provoking as it deals with getting answers to questions that could have haunt you until your on your death bed.
Kuddos to this Japanese author!
The Wise Words: 
The Wrap:
I am not particularly happy with how Murakami ended the story though Tzukuri was able to get a closure that he deserved.
~