Twinkling Sky

The black blanket adorned with little twinkling lights stared silently as my gazing eyes let the pregnant, salty tears fall. My feet, soaked against cold knee-high flood caused by the constant battle between the moon and the earth, are both wrinkled and chilled.

Yet deep inside, my weary soul is wrapped with warmth— warmth after basking in the sea of hopelessness, warmth in a freshly found faith brought by those small stars which twinkles in sync with the beat of my tired heart.

If the mighty He made my tear-stained eyes see the stars’ sparkling beauty, He might also hear the fervent prayers of a little dot on earth called me.

Humans are under
the same changing, twinkling sky.
I am never alone.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo credit: Unsplash

In response to dVerse‘s Haibun Monday – Twinkle Twinkle by Toni of kanzensakura who also wrote about Night Sky!

dverse

Whether it is a childhood memory or a recent event, I would like for you all to write a one paragraph haibun ending it with a nature based haiku (remember, haiku are always about nature and haibun are always non-fiction).  Give us your heart, your humor, your expertise about the night sky….Whatever happened to you under a night sky from sunset to sunrise.

Summer Choir

I still remember: the gentle rush of the calm yet humming cerulean ocean as it hugs the waiting sun-bathed sand and silent shells ashore; the sweet whisper of the whistling wind as it combs the golden grass strands who always beg for more; and then the loud yet soothing klee-ew sounds of the winged gulls flying freely above the expansive salted-water-made floor.

Our beating hearts sung
softly with that summer choir.
Do you remember?

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to dVerse‘s Tuesday Poetics: The Sound of LOVE by Walter J. Wojtanik. Read his Whispers of Love, too.

dverse

Also for Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie‘s Heeding Haiku With Chèvrefeuille August 17th 2016 … a summer tale.

Unexpected Fall

I’m no hopeless romantic. My mind has always won over my heart, making it always realistic. I don’t look forward to forever. I choose to relish what I have today. I don’t believe in love at first sight. I believe love is a constant, daily fight. I never thought I would fall for you. Actually, I do not want to. I always dreamed of loving someone I barely knew. Someone that is not you.

But time, fate connived
like a tree’s last leaf, I fall.
Our story was born.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


Back story: This is a non-fiction account of my own love life. 😀 My almost six-year boyfriend is actually a childhood friend. And… the haibun above says it all. ❤

In response to dVerse‘s Haibun Monday: A Little Romance by Toni of kanzen sakura. Read her own haibun here.

dverse

Hi!  Happy Haibun Monday to you all.  I hope you all have your heartsready to pen a romantic haibun.  I think we all have romance in common:  a first romance, unrequited, summer love, lost love, forever love…

You can write this easily.  Remember, a haibun is not a work of fiction, it is true.  So please share with us a romantic episode or time of your life.

Our romances are like a movie or the most mundane ordinary thing in the world.  I want you to please think and pull out your best romantic (or funniest or saddest) haibun ever.  Please give me one or two tight paragraphs with a true classic haiku at the end – nature based with a cutting or pivot in the second line.  The count will be 5-7-5 but some do write short-long-short.

And Then

And Then: A Haibun*

Cheers and squeals like flock of giddy birds bade goodbye to the newly weds. Hand on hand, he takes her to the restored Cadillac that took her to the church this morning. Twenty more minutes they’ll arrive in their home, amid winter’s rash cries their bodies will create warmth of their own. For the fifth time he kissed her soft yet with urgency, with eyes closed they were not able to see.

iced road cradles cars,
tires screech with blinding bright light,
and then there were none.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to May Book Prompts –  by Sarah Doughty and MahWrites.

Today’s prompt is And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie.

And Then There Were None

*Haibun

Haibun is a joining of prose and haiku. Originating in Japan, found as far back as the 10th century and made popular by Basho in the 17th century, it is autobiographic often taking the form of a travelogue. Modern haibun usually draws its inspiration from everyday events. The form usually opens with prose which is short narrative. It sets the scene or describes a specific moment in objective detail. The haiku that follows relates to the core of the prose bringing emotional insight through an intensified image. There can be one or more prose-haiku combinations.

  • The prose describes in depth a scene or moment in a detached manner. It should be brief, concise and poetic. It is written in present tense and does not give away the moment of insight that should be revealed in the haiku that follows.
  • The haiku should not be in direct relationship with the prose but bring a different slant to the images to heighten the emotion drawn from the defining moment of the prose revealed in the haiku. It should not repeat words or phrases from the prose.

Heart’s Birth: A Haibun*

large

Fierce wind drops, noisy wind blows, flood water inside our house flows. My clumsy-self tries so hard to tie my only pair of shoe, I have to go to school, it’s my sole due. School’s our only hope, that’s our home’s breath. Family’s in falling slope, quitting school means death.

courageous heart was
born with home’s tough winter’s breath
dream on, mom ‘ways said.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Data


In response to Daily Post: Breath and Napowrimo Day 18.

 

Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that incorporates “the sound of home.” Think back to your childhood, and the figures of speech and particular ways of talking that the people around you used, and which you may not hear anymore.

*Haibun

Haibun is a joining of prose and haiku. Originating in Japan, found as far back as the 10th century and made popular by Basho in the 17th century, it is autobiographic often taking the form of a travelogue. Modern haibun usually draws its inspiration from everyday events. The form usually opens with prose which is short narrative. It sets the scene or describes a specific moment in objective detail. The haiku that follows relates to the core of the prose bringing emotional insight through an intensified image. There can be one or more prose-haiku combinations.

  • The prose describes in depth a scene or moment in a detached manner. It should be brief, concise and poetic. It is written in present tense and does not give away the moment of insight that should be revealed in the haiku that follows.
  • The haiku should not be in direct relationship with the prose but bring a different slant to the images to heighten the emotion drawn from the defining moment of the prose revealed in the haiku. It should not repeat words or phrases from the prose.