Cloud of Pain

the thing about sadness is
it’s like a thick rain cloud
clogged inside your throat
blocking your breath,
your words,
even your screams.
you want to melt it,
get rid of it,
but it becomes bigger and bigger
choking you further and further.

but the thing about sadness is
when you finally surrender and bask
on its harsh downpour,
its painful drops
will help you grow,
will help you rise,
will help you heal, until
the suffocating cloud
finally bowed, finally bowed.

and the thing about sadness
being a dark rain cloud is it’s
living in a fading permanence.
it will pass.
it will fade.

but you, you are the sometimes defeated
yet always fighting sun.
you will rise again and again,
until no cloud of pain remains.
until no cloud of pain remains.

P.S. This is the poem I mentioned to you, Ameena. 🙂

05.06.2017
©2017 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash

In response to Poetics: Poems that could save your life by kim881.
The challenge is to write a poem to save someone’s life on one of the following themes:
apologies  –  bad hair day  –  bereavement  –  big decision  –  birthday blues  –  career crisis  –  commitment problems  –  divorce  –  does my bottom look big in this?  –  don’t let the bastards get you down  –  first date  –  first wrinkle  –  friendship  –  getting married  – hangover  –  illness  –  insomnia  –  is this relationship going anywhere?  –  is this the real thing?  –  Monday morning  –  money worries  –  moving house  –  parenthood  –  playing away  –  retail therapy  –  rock bottom  –  stressed out  – successfully single  –  when your lover has gone
dverse

 

Nature’s Calling: A Naani

If grief’s a black smoke
we’ll all be blind now.
Killings, murders, hate
are they nature’s calling?
Or we’re just all fan of dying?

Photo credit: Unsplash

In response to OctPoWriMo 2016 by Morgan Dragonwillow‘s Day 21.

The Naani is a stanzaic form found at Shadow Poetry and is most often an observation of human relations or current events although it can be open to any subject. Naani means “an expression of one and all”. The stanza form was introduced by Dr. N. Gopi an administrator at the Teluga University.

The defining features of the Naani are:

  • stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains.
  • syllabic, with a total syllable count of between 20 and 25 syllables.

Waiting Under the Gray Clouds

You said we are
never too far
until we are
under the same sky.

“You are my sun,
I am your moon.”
But then why did
we end so soon?

As blue clouds
turns to gray,
I’ll try to keep
my tears at bay.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo credit: Unsplash

In response to dVerse‘s Quadrille #18: Clouds by kim881 who wrote about Busting Clouds.

dverse

Here’s how to Quadrille:

– Write a poem of exactly 44 words, including the word cloud.
– Put your poem on your blog and link back to this post.
– Link it up to our Mr. Linky.
– Visit other blogs. Enjoy some amazing poets. Comment. Come back later this week and write another one, and visit some more. Comment some more. Create as many poem clouds as you please. I’ll be reading all week.

Time’s Sparkling Void

I thought the turning time
can successfully erase traces
of the sparkling, beating void
your goodbye left inside my tattered soul.
A decade after, it becomes clear.
I am wrong.

Photo credit: Unsplash

In response to OctPoWriMo 2016 by Morgan Dragonwillow‘s Day 1, 2 and 3.

P.S. I combined the first three prompts because I was late. 😦 Forgive me. ❤

Am I Gone?

Is there somebody
who’ll be willing to save
my soul, my heart, me.

They say I
only feel
the love I like,
they don’t know I’m
slowly fading
dying, drifting away.

Inspired by City Lights by Sara Bareilles.

04.08.2016
©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer

Photo credit: Unsplash

Astrobleme

26

Astrobleme: An Abhanga*

you are the huge meteor
that dig a deep crater
still hollow years after—
no time can heal.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

Word Inspiration: Sarah Doughty of Heartstring Eulogies (Thank you, Sarah!)


*Abhanga, “the completion” is a stanzaic form commonly used for devotional poetic composition although it has also been used for cynicism, satire and reflective moods. It was popular from the 13th thru 17th centuries Marathi Region of India and is described as complex and classic.

The Abhanga is:

  • stanzaic, written in any number of 4 line stanzas.
  • syllabic, 6-6-6-4 syllables each
  • rhymed L2 and L3 rhyme. Often internal rhyme is employed. End rhyme scheme x a a x , x being unrhymed.

Word-High July: Amihan

21

Amihan

The whistling wind
is like a ghost
that creeps inside
my hollow holes
dug by
your sudden absence.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer

Photo credit: BuzzFeed, Unsplash


In response to Word-High July: 30 Beautiful Filipino Words: Day 21 – Amihan.

Banner 1

Aurora

15

Aurora: An Aubade*

Colors changing
from dark to light,
sun and moon shifting
from dull to bright,
stars disappearing
goodbye black night,
I lie awake waiting
for you to comeback.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash.com

Word Inspiration: Sarah Doughty of Heartstring Eulogies (Thank you, Sarah!)


*Aubade

Alba or Aubade (dawn song) is a love poem, specifically the parting of lovers at dawn. Conflict between love and responsibility is at the center of this poetic genre.

This genre dates back to 12th century France and is the counterpart to a secular Evensong, Serena or Serenade.. The name Alba comes from the medieval watchman’s cry “alba” announcing the passing of the night and return of day. The early Occitan troubadourpoems ended each stanza with the word.

The Alba or Aubade is:

  • a love poem, most often mourning the parting of lovers while extolling the coming day.
  • constructed at the discretion of the poet, length, stanzaic form, meter and or rhyme. although often a smattering of rhyme is present without any particular rhyme scheme.
  • dramatic since it is often dialogue between the parting lovers or coming from a cuckold husband or a watchman’ warning. Sometimes dialogue is silent, expressed in images.

 

Death Spills

Death Spills: A Lai*

Twas a normal day
within blooming May
until
blue clouds turns to gray,
it’s too late to pray,
or kneel,
your soul flew away,
left bones to decay—
death spills.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to May Book Prompts –  by Sarah Doughty and MahWrites.

Today’s prompt is The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold.

The Lovely Bones

The Lai* is a short story in verse. In its strictest form it is a verse form with a rhymed syllabic pattern in three tercets.

The Lai as verse form is:

  • a narrative, tells a story.
  • usually a nonet, 9 lines made up of 3 tercets. It can be a hexastich made up of 2 tercets.(When written in 9 lines is can also be called a Bergerette or a Viralai stanza.)
  • rhymed, rhyme scheme aab aab aab.
  • syllabic, syllables per line are 5-5-2 5-5-2 5-5-2
  • Tradition states that the short line must not be indented; it must be left dressed to the poem.

 

Beneath the Mango Tree

Beneath the Mango Tree: A Spoon River Verse*

My heart hasn’t beaten, lungs didn’t breathe even. No one knows my fragile body was laid beneath the mango tree, behind a house that’s shabby, where she lived— my unknown mommy.

It was war time when she was raped, a faceless man brought her early grave. In split second, I felt the magnitude, of her pain, and love, her motherly attitude. But I am weak and I gave in, away from her arms towards hundred years of solitude.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Unsplash


In response to May Book Prompts –  by Sarah Doughty and MahWrites.

Today’s prompt is One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez.

One Hundred Years of Solitude

*Spoon River Verse is a subgenre of Mask or Persona poetry. The term is inspired by the Spoon River Anthology by Edgar Lee Masters, American Poet (1869-1950). The anthology is a series of poems written as if each poem was being spoken by the dead. The setting is a cemetery in an imaginary western town, Spoon River. The voices make up a ‘history’ of the town’s past residents and their relationships.

The Spoon River poem is a poem of voice. The poem speaks from and for a person, not necessarily the poet. The subject, diction and imagery should reflect the character who is speaking through the poem.

Spoon River Verse is:

  • framed at the discretion of the poet.
  • dramatic.
  • written in the voice of a character of a particular time and place. Usually the voice comes from the grave. The person, the era, the location should all be heard through the words of the poem.