homebound

i have wandered far
from Your loving bay,
i believed alone i
can pave my own way.

step one, two, then three
i walked away slowly
from Your presence like
a bird breaking free.

not knowing never have
You locked me inside
of Your words and light,
my God, bring me back.

08.02.2017
©2017 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash
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Kilig sa Harana (Sweet Serenade): A Kasa*

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Kilig sa Harana (Sweet Serenade): A Kasa

Bawat indak ng gitara               Your guitar’s dancing, in sweet strums
ang daliri’y tumitipa                 with your fingers, lovely tune hums
o pagsintang kay tamis            intense passion, so warm, so dear
musikang bumibigkis.              in music, you say it, so clear.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Mike Giles


In response to Napowrimo Day 17.

 

Today, I challenge you to find, either on your shelves or online, a specialized dictionary. This could be, for example, a dictionary of nautical terms, or woodworking terms, or geology terms. Anything, really, so long as it’s not a standard dictionary! Now write a poem that incorporates at least ten words from your specialized source.

I am from the little country of the Philippines and I used two of the 36 Of The Most Beautiful Words In The Philippine Language: kilig and harana.

"Kilig"

(Quick note: Kilig is now part of English oxford dictionary!!! <3)

"Harana"

*Kasa

Kasa in Korean means song-words and is compared to the Chinese rhyme prose (fu). Its defining features are the lack of stanza breaks, lines of variable length and its tendency to describe through parallelism. The form dates back to 15th century Korea.

The Kasa, (song-words) is:

  • syllabic, 7-syllable lines broken by caesura into alternating groups of 3 and 4 syllables or 8 syllable lines broken by caesura into equal 4 syllable phrases.
  • strophic which can vary in number of lines.
  • tends to describe or expose through parallels.
  • written from unrequited love, patriotism, daily life, nostalgia, etc.

Read more of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!

Burning Heart: A Tanaga*

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Burning Heart: A Tanaga*

Spring’s warm sprays defrost cold heart
Frozen veins wake up, restarts
Your roots slowly crawls, take part
Will you make heart a sweet art?

I nurture, tend, rear, your pulps
as you reveal bold red-striped bulbs
stunned, dazed, amazed I gulp,
heart’s now burning with your love.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Fine Art America


In response to Napowrimo Day 5.

 

Today, I challenge you to spend some time looking at the names of heirloom plants, and write a poem that takes its inspiration from, or incorporates the name of, one or more of these garden rarities.

*Tanaga

  • The Tanaga is a Filipino stanzaic form that was originally written in Tagolog which to my ear is one of the more musical of languages. (Kumusta ka? Mabuti salam at) The form dates back to the 16th century and has an oral tradition. The poems are not titled. Each is emotionally charged and asks a question that begs an anwer. This form was found at Kaleidoscope.The Tanaga is:
    • stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains.
    • syllabic, 7-7-7-7 syllables per line.
    • rhymed, originally aaaa bbbb cccc etc., modern Tanagas also use aabb ccdd etc or abba cddc etc or any combination rhyme can be used.
    • composed with the liberal use of metaphor.
    • untitled.

Burning Heart

It’s no wonder striped tulips were among the most valuable during the Holland’s tulip-mania in the 1600s. ‘Burning Heart’ is an exceptional selection with creamy blooms streaked with bold red.

Name: Tulipa ‘Burning Heart’

Bloom Season: Mid spring

Growing Conditions: Full sun and well-drained soil

Size: To 2 feet tall

Zones:4-6