10 book quotes from my recent reads

I missed last week of  The Artsy Reader’s Top Ten Tuesday so here I am catching up. 🙂 Given that I do not have much to share about books with fall covers, please allow me to post about: Favorite Book Quotes (these could be quotes from books you love, or bookish quotes in general).

Suppose permission is granted, here are the lines that moved my heart from my most recent reads. 🙂

1. “Heaven knows we need never be ashamed of our tears, for they are rain upon the blinding dust of earth, overlying our hard hearts.” ― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

2. “Remember: the quality of the answers we get in this life is based on the quality of the questions we ask.” ―  Charles R. Johnson, The Way of the Writer: Reflections on the Art and Craft of Storytelling

Not Here

3. “No one wants to be alive when they’re forgotten.” ― Hieu Minh Nguyen, Not Here

4. “If you want to know why people sacrifice everything for love, you have to start by asking how they fell in love.” ― Stephen Westaby, Fragile Lives: A Heart Surgeon’s Stories of Life and Death on the Operating Table

5. “You have to have a home first to be uprooted from it. You have to know what love is to feel alone.” ― Etaf Rum, A Woman is No Man

Things My Son Needs to Know about the World

6. “Life is all about small margins. A few inches here and there.” ― Fredrik Backman, Things My Son Needs to Know About the World

7. “Every time you sat down to create something your soul was at stake. Every page—indeed, every paragraph—had been a risk. Every sentence had been a prayer.” ― Charles R. Johnson, Night Hawks: Stories

Sea Prayer

8. “You know a bomb crater
can be made into a swimming hole.

You have learned
dark blood is better news
than bright.”
― Khaled Hosseini, Sea Prayer

9. “What is pertinent is the calmness of beauty, its sense of restraint. It is as though the land knows of its own beauty, its own greatness, and feels no need to shout it.” ― Kazuo Ishiguro, The Remains of the Day

Children of the Land

10. I thought about what I had lost, what I continued to lose, and I realized it was the same thing we had been losing for centuries, the ability to say “enough.” ― Marcelo Hernandez Castillo, Children of the Land

What are your favorite book quotes? Share them below with your TTT, too!

10.06.2020
©2020 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photos via The Artsy Reader and Goodreads
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

on Mars and moth

Man-made machines flying will not satiate humans’ dreaming
from the clouds to the moon, even Mars is under planning.
A brave moth hunting for the fire that can burn its metal wings.

07.21.2019
©2019 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo by David Dibert on Unsplash

In response to Sonya of Only 100 Words‘ Three Line Tales, Week 181
If you want to go full Apollo 11, check out Apollo in Real Time – it’s amazing and I can’t wait for the Moon landing on Saturday. If you’re not into space exploration, remember that the picture is only the starting point. You take your lines wherever you want.
If you want to join, here are the simple rules:
  • Write three lines inspired by the photo prompt.
  • Link back to this post.
  • Tag your post with 3LineTales (so we can find you in the Reader).
  • Read and comment on other TLT participants’ lines.
  • Have fun.

blanket and shame (a dizain*)

Still wrapped in blanket of soft innocence,
like a butterfly fresh from its cocoon,
a young breath given too short existence
by evil desire of a maniac goon.
A lifeless, cold shell wimps a wordless croon.

An animal act, perhaps it is not,
for mammals, reptiles, these kingdoms just ought
to kill to survive. But humans, we have
become brainless, salivating, cracked nuts,
drowned by earth’s urges, a shame of Above.

My lines bleed for the one-year-old boy raped and murdered by a drunk man in my motherland, the Philippines. My heart breaks. My soul is burning with rage. Why. Why. Why. What have we become. What have we become.

07.19.2019
©2019 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo by Henry & Co. on Unsplash
For dVerse Poetry Form: Dizain 
Brief History
The *dizain is a 10-line form which – like so many good ones – originated in France. It was popular there in the 15th and 16 Centuries, and has also been used by such famous English poets as John Keats and Philip Sidney.
Basic Structure
The basic rules for the dizain are that it has one stanza consisting of 10 lines, with 10 syllables per line, and the rhyme scheme is ababbccdcd. Do you see how the second half of the stanza sort of mirrors the rhyme scheme of the first? Not using the same rhymes,but reversing the sequence. It’s more obvious if I make a break between sections: ababb ccdcd – though the poem is not usually written with a break.

fading murmurs (a villanelle)

Soft murmurs say the end is near,
this earth will crumble, disappear.
Will you let your story end here?

Mouths gurgling aged, frozen beer,
choosing to leave peace’s hemisphere.
Soft murmurs say the end is near,

tired earth sinks under cloud of fear,
birds choke with vows so insincere,
will you let your story end here?

Even spring delays its annual cheer,
while fragile buds still persevere.
Soft murmurs say the end is near,

more hands now filled with bloodsmear.
Helpless in this cruel atmosphere,
will you let your story end here?

No, you cannot save all humans, dear,
but you can be: change’s pioneer.
Soft murmurs say the end is near,
please don’t let your story end here.

04.12.2019
©2019 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.
Photo via Unsplash

Inspired by dVerse Toolkit: Rhymes and Slant Rhymes

2016 Reading Challenge Update: April Part 2

“All grown-ups were once children… but only few of them remember it.” ― Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince


I have read seven books last April and the first four are posted here. As promised, here are the three more good reads I had last month!

25th –A book at least 100 Years Older Than You  – The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

The Little Prince

Rating: 💖 💖 💖 💖 💖 (GREAT READ!)

What is it about: With a timeless charm it tells the story of a little boy who leaves the safety of his own tiny planet to travel the universe, learning the vagaries of adult behaviour through a series of extraordinary encounters. His personal odyssey culminates in a voyage to Earth and further adventures.

What I Love: It is simple, succinct yet it can impact your views in life. Now I know why it’s one of the best classics.

What I Don’t Love Much: Nothing!

Wise Words: 

“You see, one loves the sunset when one is so sad.”

“What makes the desert beautiful,’ said the little prince, ‘is that somewhere it hides a well…”

26th – A romance set in the future – Every Last Word by Tamara Ireland Stone

Every Last Word

Rating: 💖 💖 💖 💖 💖 (GREAT READ!)

What is it about: Samantha McAllister looks just like the rest of the popular girls in her junior class. But hidden beneath the straightened hair and expertly applied makeup is a secret that her friends would never understand: Sam has Purely-Obsessional OCD and is consumed by a stream of dark thoughts and worries that she can’t turn off.

Second-guessing every move, thought, and word makes daily life a struggle, and it doesn’t help that her lifelong friends will turn toxic at the first sign of a wrong outfit, wrong lunch, or wrong crush. Yet Sam knows she’d be truly crazy to leave the protection of the most popular girls in school. So when Sam meets Caroline, she has to keep her new friend with a refreshing sense of humor and no style a secret, right up there with Sam’s weekly visits to her psychiatrist.

Caroline introduces Sam to Poet’s Corner, a hidden room and a tight-knit group of misfits who have been ignored by the school at large. Sam is drawn to them immediately, especially a guitar-playing guy with a talent for verse, and starts to discover a whole new side of herself. Slowly, she begins to feel more “normal” than she ever has as part of the popular crowd . . . until she finds a new reason to question her sanity and all she holds dear.

What I Love: I am glad I picked this in a whim because I have no idea of the Poet’s Corner. I love how the suspense builds and how the story cascades. I love the poetries included and the diversity of poets this book have showed.

Finally, the twist gave me goosies!

What I Don’t Love Much: Nothing!

Wise Words: 

“Everyone’s got something. Some people are just better actors than others.”

“Mistakes. Trial and error. Same thing. Mistakes are how we learned to walk and run and that hot things burn when you touch them. You’ve made mistakes all your life and you’re going to keep making them.”

27 – A book recommended by a family member – You Can You Will: 8 Undeniable Qualities of a Winner by Joel Osteen

You Can You Will: 8 Undeniable Qualities of a Winner

Rating: 💖 💖 💖 💖 💖 (GREAT READ!)

What is it about: In 8 UNDENIABLE QUALITIES OF A WINNER, Joel Osteen focuses on the irrefutable traits and attributes of highly successful people. These personal qualities are tested through the ages and all types of circumstances. These practical principles guide the lives of champions.

What I Love: The wise words that touched my soul.

What I Don’t Love Much: Nothing!

Wise Words: 

“You don’t need their approval when you have God’s approval.”

“You need to be around people who know more than you and have more talent than you. Don’t be intimidated by them; be inspired.”

“You weren’t created to simply exist, to endure, or to go through the motions; you were created to be really alive.”

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo Credit: Manrepeller, Shamilar, Goodreads

Story Summary: Goodreads


What are you favorite reads this month?

Have you read any of this?

Do you agree with me?

:)

Let’s talk!

2016 Reading Challenge Update: March

update

“The holes in your life are permanent. You have to grow around them, like tree roots around concrete; you mould yourself through the gaps.” ― Paula Hawkins, The Girl on the Train


Thank you Holy Week’s five-day-long break for letting me catch up read! 😀

18th – A book that’s under 150 pages – Kindred Spirits 

Kindred Spirits

What is it about: If you broke Elena’s heart, Star Wars would spill out. So when she decides to queue outside her local cinema to see the new movie, she’s expecting a celebration with crowds of people who love Han, Luke and Leia just as much as she does. What she’s not expecting is to be last in a line of only three people; to have to pee into a collectible Star Wars soda cup behind a dumpster or to meet that unlikely someone who just might truly understand the way she feels. Kindred Spirits is an engaging short story by Rainbow Rowell, author of the bestselling Eleanor & Park, Fangirl and Carry On, and is part of a handful of selected short reads specially produced for World Book Day.

What I Love: Rainbow Rowell’s trademark of easy, light read.

What I Don’t Love Much: It’s so ‘light’ for me or maybe because I am no fan of Star Wars. 

Rating: 💖 💖 💖 (Good read)

19th – A book you haven’t read since high school – Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice

What is it about: Since its immediate success in 1813, Pride and Prejudice has remained one of the most popular novels in the English language. Jane Austen called this brilliant work “her own darling child” and its vivacious heroine, Elizabeth Bennet, “as delightful a creature as ever appeared in print.” The romantic clash between the opinionated Elizabeth and her proud beau, Mr. Darcy, is a splendid performance of civilized sparring. And Jane Austen’s radiant wit sparkles as her characters dance a delicate quadrille of flirtation and intrigue, making this book the most superb comedy of manners of Regency England.

What I Love: The dialogues, the way it was written. The subtle comedy hidden between some serious-looking lines.

What I Don’t Love Much: I cannot say. Maybe classics are just not my cup of tea.

Wise Words:

“The power of doing anything with quickness is always prized much by the possessor, and often without any attention to the imperfection of the performance.”

“I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book!”

Rating: 💖 💖 💖 (Good read)

20th – A book set in Europe – After You (Me Before You, #2) by Jojo Moyes

After You (Me Before You, #2)

What is it about: Louisa Clark is no longer just an ordinary girl living an ordinary life. After the transformative six months spent with Will Traynor, she is struggling without him. When an extraordinary accident forces Lou to return home to her family, she can’t help but feel she’s right back where she started.

Her body heals, but Lou herself knows that she needs to be kick-started back to life. Which is how she ends up in a church basement with the members of the Moving On support group, who share insights, laughter, frustrations, and terrible cookies. They will also lead her to the strong, capable Sam Fielding—the paramedic, whose business is life and death, and the one man who might be able to understand her. Then a figure from Will’s past appears and hijacks all her plans, propelling her into a very different future. . . .

What I Love: Jojo Moyes’ skillful tugs-the-heart storytelling prowess remains. I still shed a few tears while reading the last chapters.

What I Don’t Love Much: The problem with sequels is that they can never, ever top the first book. While After You is actually good, Me Before You is not just better, it’s Moyes’ best (for me).

Wise Words:

“Too many people follow their own happiness without a thought for the damage they leave in their wake.”

“The only way to avoid being left behind was to start moving.”

Rating: 💖 💖 💖 (Good read)

21st – A book that’s becoming a movie this year – The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

The Girl on the Train

What is it about: Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. “Jess and Jason,” she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.

And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

What I Love: Everything!
The creepy prologue.
The three-view and all-engrossing overlapping storytelling.
The several thought-provoking red herrings.
The sudden surprising twist and turns.
The intricate details unravelling softly like a flower getting rid of its layers of petals slowly..
The unexpected ending.
Again, everything!

What I Don’t Love Much: Yep! Nothing!

Wise Words:

“Life is not a paragraph, and death is no parenthesis.”

“…let’s be honest: women are still only really valued for two things—their looks and their role as mothers. I’m not beautiful, and I can’t have kids, so what does that make me? Worthless.”

Rating: 💖 💖 💖 💖 💖 (GREAT read!)

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Pop Sugar and Goodreads

Story Summary: Goodreads


What are you favorite reads this month?

Have you read any of this?

Do you agree with me?

:)

Let’s talk!

 

2016 Reading Challenge Update: Part 2

update

Before the year ‘leaped’, I was able to read four more books for this month. (My first update for February is here.)

So here are the awesome novels that I have read on and before the 29th. ❤

13th – A classic from the 20th century – To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird

What is it about: Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, To Kill A Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior—to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos. Now with over 18 million copies in print and translated into forty languages, this regional story by a young Alabama woman claims universal appeal. Harper Lee always considered her book to be a simple love story. Today it is regarded as a masterpiece of American literature.

What I Love: The depth of the the topic told in an innocent view is just flawless. Now I know the meaning of ‘classic’

What I Don’t Love Much: Honestly, the pace of the first few chapters are a bit slooooow for me.

Wise Words: 

“I never loved to read. One does not love breathing.”

“Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us not to try to win.”

“People in their right minds never take pride in their talents.”

Rating: 💖 💖 💖  💖 (Good read, definitely!)

14th – A YA bestseller – Ten Thousand Truths by Susan White

Ten Thousand Truths

What is it about: “Thirteen-year-old Rachel is bad news, or so her foster care worker tells her. She’s been shuttled from one rotten foster family to another ever since her mother and brother died in a car accident five years ago, and she’s running out of options. So when she gets caught shoplifting and is kicked out of her latest home, the only place left to send her is the last resort for kids like her; a farm in the middle of nowhere run by a disfigured recluse named Amelia Walton, whom Rachel names ‘Warty’ because of the strange lumps covering her face and neck.

Rachel settles into life on the farm, losing herself in daily chores and Amelia’s endless trivia and trying to forget her past and the secret she’s holding inside. But when a letter arrives for her out of the blue, Rachel soon realizes that you can’t hide from your past – or your future.”

What I Love: The descriptions of the lovely farm is just so vivid that it felt I was also there.

The literal ten thousand truths are both entertaining and informative.

What I Don’t Love Much: It is a bit short of that ‘oomph’. That feeling which give readers a book hangover.

Wise Words:

“Most of the beliefs in our shortcomings are spoken much louder from within than from anyone else.”

Rating: 💖 💖 💖 💖 (Good read, definitely!)

15th – A satirical book – Macarthur by Bob Ong

Macarthur

What is it about: A group of four boys with lives ‘destroyed’ in different ways but are united in ‘drugs’ and in a strong friendship bond.

What I Love: Powerfully written. The language used are explicit yet so real. The twists are jaw-dropping and saddening. The subtle way of tackling friendship within a group of ‘addict’ boys are heartwarming.

What I Don’t Love Much: None.

Rating: 💖 💖 💖 💖 💖 (GREAT read!)

16th – A science-fiction novel – The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

The Ocean at the End of the Lane

What is it about: Sussex, England. A middle-aged man returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral. Although the house he lived in is long gone, he is drawn to the farm at the end of the road, where, when he was seven, he encountered a most remarkable girl, Lettie Hempstock, and her mother and grandmother. He hasn’t thought of Lettie in decades, and yet as he sits by the pond (a pond that she’d claimed was an ocean) behind the ramshackle old farmhouse, the unremembered past comes flooding back. And it is a past too strange, too frightening, too dangerous to have happened to anyone, let alone a small boy.

Forty years earlier, a man committed suicide in a stolen car at this farm at the end of the road. Like a fuse on a firework, his death lit a touchpaper and resonated in unimaginable ways. The darkness was unleashed, something scary and thoroughly incomprehensible to a little boy. And Lettie—magical, comforting, wise beyond her years—promised to protect him, no matter what.

What I Love: I am no fan of fantasy and the ‘unplanned’ reading of this novel showed me I can love that genre, too.

Neil Gaiman is indeed a skill-full storyteller who can make you angry and scared. His words in this novel are short yet alive.

What I Don’t Love Much: None. 🙂

Wise Words: 

“Books were safe than other people anyway.”

Rating: 💖 💖 💖 💖 💖 (GREAT read!)

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Pop SugarGoodreads, Quote Fancy, Board of Wisdom and Like Success

Story Summary: Goodreads


What are you favorite reads last month?

Have you read any of this?

Do you agree with me?

🙂

Let’s talk!

~

Let’s read classics!

If you’re on a hunt for the best must-read classic novels, then read on! 

Because ‘to read more classic’ has been an infamous bookish resolution last Tuesday, here is a short list of recommendations I got from some awesome book lovers!

I am more than happy to receive all the encouraging comments for my new year’s resolution post last Tuesday! What’s best is that I now have a handful of must-read classics to choose from for this year!

And I am sharing it with you! ❤

From Belinda of Changing my World with Words

“Pride and Prejudice” is a always a good one, but if the 20th century is okay with you, try “To Kill a Mockingbird” or “Rebecca.”

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee  

To Kill a Mockingbird

Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

Rebecca

From Mandi of Mandibelle Thoughts Expressions and Articles

“Emma is great by Jane Austen, The Scarlet Letter by Nathanial Hawthorne, Alice in Wonderland and Alive Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, The Virgin and the Gypsy by D.H. Lawrence, or Son’s and Lovers by the same. The Great Gatsby by Fitzgerald.”

Emma by Jane Austen

Emma

The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Scarlet Letter

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Alice in Wonderland (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, #1)

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer & Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer & Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

The Virgin and the Gypsy by D.H. Lawrence

The Virgin and the Gipsy

Sons and Lovers by D.H. Lawrence

Sons and Lovers

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby

From Irene of Toodles Irene!

“So far the only classic I’ve really enjoyed has been Of Mice And Men by John Steinbeck.”

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

Of Mice and Men

From Wendleberry of Marvel at Words

Some off the cuff recommendations:

I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith

Howl’s Moving Castle by Diane Wynne Jones

We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson

Herland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith

I Capture the Castle

We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson

We Have Always Lived in the Castle

Herland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Herland

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

The Picture of Dorian Gray

From Alyssa of Book Club Babe

My fav classics are either romances (Wuthering Heights, Age of Innocence) or dystopia (1984, Brave New World).

Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

Wuthering Heights

The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton

The Age of Innocence

1984 by George Orwell

1984

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

Brave New World

From Christopher of CLCouch123

“If you’re interested in a kind of classic, I might be able to advise. I happened to buy two new novels while I was away. They are The Fifth Gospel by Ian Caldwell–sort of a Vatican conspiracy-thriller–and The Well by Catherine Chanter, which looks freakish and I trust will be freakishly good.”

The Fifth Gospel by Ian Caldwell

The Fifth Gospel: A Novel

From Lynn of Books and Travelling with Lynn

Lots of great classics out there – I second Wendleberry’s above – particularly Howl’s Moving Castle.

Howl’s Moving Castle (Howl’s Moving Castle, #1) by Diana Wynne Jones

Howl's Moving Castle (Howl's Moving Castle, #1)

Photo credit: Favim and Goodreads

Have you picked your classic now?

Please tell me!

If you have more recommendations, please share! 😀

P.S.

Thank you BelindaMandiIreneWendleberry, AlyssaChristopher, and Lynn for sharing to me your classic insights!

~

DAY Eleven

It is day 11 of 30 Day Book Challenge. So here’s my answer to the question for the day:

       11.   Favorite classic book.

Because this is published on 1939, I think this one’s really a classic.

I just recently read And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie and it is my favorite classic book, for now. (Because To Kill A Mockingbird is in my TBR list also and I’ve heard it is a very good read.)

She is the first author in my list of new writers to try and among her so many books, I have picked this novel. Surprisingly, the story’s great. The first time that I have I read Ten Little Indian, the re-hashed version, I had goosies! Bad goosies!

Agatha Christie is indeed a creepy, intelligent writer.

I would like to say more but I won’t. I’ll reserve my blurbs for my review. I hope I can write my review for this creepy book tonight or tomorrow.

That’s it!

~