Inside My Suitcase-Heart: A Double Acrostic*

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Who’s inside my suitcase-heart? It’s for you to find out. ❤

Inside My Suitcase-Heart: A Double Acrostic*

Mind’s amazed with Taj
yet I don’t want to
let grandiose acts
obscure essence of love.
Vivid sincere acts that sweep,
enough, ‘cause my heart’s easy to reach.

©2016 Rosemawrites@A Reading Writer. All Rights Reserved.

Photo credit: Pixabay


In response to Daily Post: Suitcase and Napowrimo Day 15.

 

Because today marks the halfway point in our 30-day sprint, today I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that incorporates the idea of doubles. You could incorporate doubling into the form, for example, by writing a poem in couplets. Or you could make doubles the theme of the poem, by writing, for example, about mirrors or twins, or simply things that come in pairs. Or you could double your doublings by incorporating things-that-come-in-twos into both your subject and form.

*Double Acrostic

Double Acrostic was a popular verse in the 1800s apparently spurred by Queen Victoria’s favoritism. She is said to have used this technique in her own writing. It was sometimes viewed more as a puzzle to be solved than a verse form. The verse can either spell the same word down the first letter of each line margin and the lastletter of each line margin or spell a word or phrase down the first letter of the line and another word or phrase up the last letter of the line.

This piece is said to have been written by Queen Victoria and was found at
Poems of Today and Yesterday

NapleS
ElbE
WashingtoN
CincinnatI
AmsterdaM
StambouL
TorneA
LepantO
EcliptiC

You figured it out? 😀

Read more of my Napowrimo 2016 poems here!

 

41 thoughts on “Inside My Suitcase-Heart: A Double Acrostic*”

  1. Oh my God! Rose this is so beautiful. Your love Joseph! I have actually tried somethinh like this, without really knowing it was a form. And I didn’t really understand your explanation.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You got it, dear Nandita! 🙂

      Thank you! Sorry about the explanation. I read it and I somehow didn’t understand it too. HAHAHa. I just looked at the example. 🙂 (Though mine’s a bit different). I use the letters of the word MY LOVE for the beginning of each line. Then use the letters of the word JOSEPH for the ending of each line. I hope I made a clearer explanation? 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Aww! My Love Joseph? Who is this Joseph? Is he real perosn? I’m sorry, I’m being nosy. Back to the poem, this is so creative. A regular acrostic is challenging enough, but a double acrostic? And your poem is so sweet and actually makes sense on top of that!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes! It’s my love Joseph. 🙂 He is a real person. My boyfriend of almost six years. 🙂 (I’m fine with nosy ’cause I’m nosy, too! :D)
      That is true. This one’s tough especially looking for a word ending with ‘j’. I almost quit. Haha. thank you, dear! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I will make him read your comment, Mel! HAHA
      Thank you! It is really tough, specially his name that starts with ‘j’. There are very few words that ends with ‘J’. I almost abandoned the idea. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  3. “Vivid sincere acts” as the better way to the heart. Better than “grandiose” things. I think real love is built through authenticity more than ornamentation. I see that message here and, if it’s right, such a good message.

    I enjoy the way you arrange the acrostic. It was easier and more enjoyable to follow that that given in the example (even knowing the expression “coals to Newcastle” on which the example’s based).

    Happy loving days for you, Rosema!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you very much, Christopher! 🙂 Love this comment: “I think real love is built through authenticity more than ornamentation.”
      You got it so right in just a single lovely line. 🙂 I believe that simple small acts weigh heavier that grand ones. Boyfie knows it. He knows it well. 🙂
      Thank you! 🙂 Hope you’re having some love-ful days too! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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